Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > A modified device fabrication process achieves enhanced spin transport in graphene

Abstract:
Researchers from the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group have proposed a modified graphene-based nanodevice fabrication technique that has increased up to three times the spin lifetime and relaxation length compared to previous work of the same kind. The work was fruit of the collaboration with Imec and K.U. Leuven (Belgium). The results have been published in 2D Materials and are expected to empower investigations on large-scale spintronics applications.

A modified device fabrication process achieves enhanced spin transport in graphene

Barcelona, Spain | Posted on August 6th, 2019

Spintronics is a field of research that was born in the 1980s. It amplifies the potential of traditional electronics by exploiting the electron’s spin degree of freedom, in addition to the usual state of charge. In the end, the goal is the same: to obtain devices to store, process and read information, but with enhanced characteristics such as lower power consumption, less heat dissipation, higher speed, etc. Although spintronics has not yet become as widespread as its conventional predecessor, some current devices are based on this new approach, such as magnetic hard disks, magnetic random access memories and magnetic sensors with varied applications in industrial environments, robotics and automotive industry.

Graphene is a promising material in this field. Spins can flow efficiently in it over long distances, meaning that they do not change their state (let’s say, from “up” to “down”) for a relatively long time. Due to its large-scale production, CVD graphene is becoming popular to fabricate spintronic devices. However, impurities arising from the graphene growth and device fabrication process limit its performance.

A team of scientists from the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group, led by ICREA Prof. Sergio O. Valenzuela, has proposed a high-yield device fabrication process from CVD graphene that has improved substantially its spin parameters. The work, whose first author is Zewdu M. Gebeyehu, was fruit of a collaboration with Imec and K.U. Leuven (Belgium). The results have been published in 2D Materials.

They demonstrate a spin signal measured across a 30 µm long channel with room-temperature spin lifetimes of up to 3 ns and spin relaxation lengths of up to 9 µm in monolayer graphene on SiO2/Si substrates. These spin parameters are the highest values for any form of graphene (both exfoliated and CVD graphene) on a standard SiO2/Si substrate.

To achieve this enhanced spin performance, the researchers used CVD graphene grown on a platinum foil and they modified the device fabrication technique so as to reduce the impurity levels associated with the graphene growth and fabrication steps. The latter requires the optimization of several standard processes, involving the preselection of high-quality uniform graphene with low level of impurities, an etching step combining e-beam lithography and oxygen plasma and a suitable post-annealing in high vacuum. The approach can be scaled and allows a highly reproducible fabrication of devices, which is the main requirement for potential industrialization.

The improvement on the spin parameters together with the reproducibility of the device fabrication process brings us closer to the realization of complex circuit architectures for spintronic devices such as spin logic and logic-in-memory for beyond CMOS computing.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Francisco J. Pańos

Copyright © ICN2

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Article reference:

Related News Press

News and information

Cyborg heart could help scientists better understand the human organ August 21st, 2019

Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials August 20th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

Graphene/ Graphite

You're not so tough, h-BN: Rice University chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications August 14th, 2019

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors: Rutgers-led research could reduce energy use, improve electronic devices August 1st, 2019

2 Dimensional Materials

You're not so tough, h-BN: Rice University chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications August 14th, 2019

Sharp meets flat in tunable 2D material: Rice's new atom-flat compounds show promise for optoelectronics, advanced computing August 12th, 2019

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors: Rutgers-led research could reduce energy use, improve electronic devices August 1st, 2019

Possible Futures

Cyborg heart could help scientists better understand the human organ August 21st, 2019

Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials August 20th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

Spintronics

Small currents for big gains in spintronics: A new low-power magnetic switching component could aid spintronic devices June 14th, 2019

Rice U. lab grows stable, ultrathin magnets: Rare iron oxide could be combined with 2D materials for electronic, spintronic devices May 24th, 2019

Let's not make big waves: A team of researchers generates ultra-short spin waves in an astoundingly simple material March 29th, 2019

Spintronics by 'straintronics': Switching superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain February 15th, 2019

Chip Technology

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

ULVAC Launches Revolutionary PZT Piezoelectric Thin-film Process Technology and HVM Solution for MEMS Sensors/Actuators: Enabling Reliable, High-quality Film Production for Next Generation Devices August 16th, 2019

Toppan Photomasks and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Enter into Multi-Year Supply Agreement August 15th, 2019

Sharp meets flat in tunable 2D material: Rice's new atom-flat compounds show promise for optoelectronics, advanced computing August 12th, 2019

Memory Technology

New Video Highlights Specific Topics Sought in Call for Papers for the 2019 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) June 13th, 2019

New interaction between thin film magnets discovered: Physicists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz lay the foundations for new three-dimensional spin structures June 7th, 2019

Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage: Army-funded research demonstrates emergent chirality in polar skyrmions for the first time in oxide superlattices May 10th, 2019

Electric skyrmions charge ahead for next-generation data storage: Berkeley Lab-led research team makes a chiral skyrmion crystal with electric properties; puts new spin on future information storage applications April 18th, 2019

Discoveries

Cyborg heart could help scientists better understand the human organ August 21st, 2019

Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials August 20th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

Materials/Metamaterials

You're not so tough, h-BN: Rice University chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications August 14th, 2019

Rice lab produces simple fluorescent surfactants: Compounds show promise for use in medicine, manufacturing August 5th, 2019

Wood You Like Some Fresh Water? New treatment for wood makes a membrane to extract fresh water August 5th, 2019

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors: Rutgers-led research could reduce energy use, improve electronic devices August 1st, 2019

Announcements

Cyborg heart could help scientists better understand the human organ August 21st, 2019

Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials August 20th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Cyborg heart could help scientists better understand the human organ August 21st, 2019

Research brief: A novel cellular process to engulf nano-sized materials August 20th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Stanford builds a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices: Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops August 19th, 2019

Industrial

CEA’s Precise Localization Technology Boosts Quality Control & Efficiency in Desoutter Tools: Algorithm and Embedded Receptors in Desoutter’s Electric & Power Tools Deliver Real-Time Monitoring & Help Meet Industry 4.0 Goals June 26th, 2019

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level June 24th, 2019

Building next gen smart materials with the power of sound May 28th, 2019

New surface treatment could improve refrigeration efficiency: A slippery surface for liquids with very low surface tension promotes droplet formation, facilitating heat transfer May 17th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project