Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New data on ultrafast electron photoemission from metallic nanostructures obtained: The results of the Russian-Japanese experiment explain the mechanism of electron photoemission by metallic nanostructures under ultrafast laser excitation

Abstract:
Metallic nanoparticle ensembles are capable of emitting short bunches of electrons when irradiated by powerful laser pulses of femtosecond (1 fs = 10-15 s) duration. Scientists at Lobachevsky University have long been studying the plasmon effect -- the excitation by light of collective electron oscillations in nanoparticles and the amplification of the light field associated with these oscillations in the vicinity of the nanoparticle, which plays the main role in this process. It is the plasmon amplification of the field that provides effective photoemission of electrons from a metal.

New data on ultrafast electron photoemission from metallic nanostructures obtained: The results of the Russian-Japanese experiment explain the mechanism of electron photoemission by metallic nanostructures under ultrafast laser excitation

Nizhnij Novgorod, Russia | Posted on May 23rd, 2019

The prospects for practical application of plasmon nanostructures are associated with their use as ultrafast photocathodes to create pulsed sources of high-brightness coherent X-ray radiation and to produce microscopes with high temporal resolution.

The photoemission of electrons from metallic nanoparticles is accompanied by the emission of terahertz radiation (its range in the scale of electromagnetic waves is between light and microwaves), which makes it possible to use this radiation as a tool for studying photoemission.

"The intensity of terahertz radiation depends non-linearly on the intensity of the laser pulse and demonstrates a high nonlinearity order (from 3 to 6 in various experiments). Although the mechanism of terahertz radiation generation by photoelectrons is not fully understood, it is believed that the high order of nonlinearity is explained by the multi-photon nature of electron emission, that is, by the need to transfer energy from several laser photons to the electron for performing the work to release the electron from the metal," explains Michael Bakunov, Head of the General Physics Department at Lobachevsky University.

To test the hypothesis of a multi-photon photoemission mechanism, scientists from Lobachevsky University together with their Japanese colleagues from Shinshu University, Osaka University and Tokyo Institute of Technology conducted an experiment in which the same metallic nanostructure, an array of gold nanorods ("golden nanoforest") was irradiated with powerful ultrashort light pulses of various wavelengths - from 600 nm to 1500 nm.

The result was surprising. Despite the fact that the energy of quanta differed more than twofold, the order of nonlinearity was approximately the same (4.5-4.8) for wavelengths from 720 to 1500 nm and even greater (6.6) for a wavelength of 600 nm (with the highest quantum energy).

"These results disprove the hypothesis of multi-photon emission of electrons. At the same time, the experimental dependences are in good agreement with the tunnel emission mechanism, whereby electrons are made to escape from the metal by a plasmon enhanced light field," concludes Michael Bakunov.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Nikita Avralev

Copyright © Lobachevsky University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The results of Russian and Japanese scientists' research were published in one of the leading scientific journals, Scientific Reports:

Related News Press

News and information

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

Small currents for big gains in spintronics: A new low-power magnetic switching component could aid spintronic devices June 14th, 2019

University of Aberdeen use the Deben CT5000 to observe compressive damage mechanisms in syntactic foam June 14th, 2019

Physics

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing: Princeton researchers detect a robust Majorana quasiparticle and show how it can be turned on and off June 14th, 2019

Possible Futures

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing: Princeton researchers detect a robust Majorana quasiparticle and show how it can be turned on and off June 14th, 2019

University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals: Researchers from the University of Konstanz's CRC 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymeriz June 14th, 2019

Discoveries

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals: Researchers from the University of Konstanz's CRC 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymeriz June 14th, 2019

Announcements

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

Small currents for big gains in spintronics: A new low-power magnetic switching component could aid spintronic devices June 14th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level June 18th, 2019

University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals: Researchers from the University of Konstanz's CRC 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymeriz June 14th, 2019

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration June 18th, 2019

New Video Highlights Specific Topics Sought in Call for Papers for the 2019 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) June 13th, 2019

Flexible generators turn movement into energy: Rice University's laser-induced graphene nanogenerators could power future wearables June 2nd, 2019

Laser technique could unlock use of tough material for next-generation electronics: Researchers make graphene tunable, opening up its band gap to a record 2.1 electronvolts May 30th, 2019

Research partnerships

2D crystals conforming to 3D curves create strain for engineering quantum devices June 7th, 2019

Shaking hands with human or robot? Nanotubes make them alike as never before June 6th, 2019

Beyond 1 and 0: Engineers boost potential for creating successor to shrinking transistors May 30th, 2019

Laser technique could unlock use of tough material for next-generation electronics: Researchers make graphene tunable, opening up its band gap to a record 2.1 electronvolts May 30th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project