Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Fighting cancer: Scientists developed a theory of 'collective behavior' of nanoparticles: Experiments with supercomputers are led by Russian and Scottish scientists

The research showed that “collective behavior” of nanoparticles produces a unique effect. Photo: Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com
The research showed that “collective behavior” of nanoparticles produces a unique effect. Photo: Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com

Abstract:
A computer experiment conducted by the scientists of Ural Federal University together with colleagues from Edinburgh showed that it is incorrect to describe the behavior of magnetic nanoparticles that provide cell heating by the sum of reactions with each of them: particles constantly interact, and their "collective behavior" produces a unique effect. The scientists have published the research output in the Physical Review E journal.

Fighting cancer: Scientists developed a theory of 'collective behavior' of nanoparticles: Experiments with supercomputers are led by Russian and Scottish scientists

Ekaterinburg, Russia | Posted on February 1st, 2019

'The computer simulation technique is cheaper than laboratory research, and we know all the parameters of each particle and all the influencing factors,' Alexei Ivanov, UrFU professor, says.

In the framework of the study, the magnetic particles (magnetic materials' particles that are one hundred times smaller than the thinnest human hair) were considered as an essential element in the cancer treatment process, when a tumor is locally exposed to heat while at the same time a patient is undergoing chemotherapy.

'By exposing the particles to an external magnetic field, one can "transport" medications precisely to a specific part of the body,' Ivanov explains. 'If you put such particles in a special substance absorbed selectively by cancer cells, an x-ray will give a contrasting picture of the tissue affected by the tumor.'

An alternating magnetic field formed by a source of alternating electrical current absorbs energy and causes particles to rotate faster and thereby provide heating. The intensity of the particles' response depends on various factors: the power of the magnetic field radiator, the frequency of its rotation, the size of the nanoparticles, how they stick to each other, etc.

UrFU professor and his colleague Philip Camp, a professor at the University of Edinburgh, predict the reaction of a whole "team" of magnetic nanoparticles to an external source of magnetic field of a particular power and frequency, using computer modeling. The Russian scientist was responsible for the theoretical underpinning of the experiment, and his colleague from Scotland for its practical execution on a supercomputer. This research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation grant.

According to the classical Debye theory from 1923, the "collective behavior" of particles is described by the sum of the reactions of each of the particles put together in an "ensemble". Computer experiments led Ivanov and Camp to the assumption that this is a misconception: particles constantly interact, influence each other and their "collective behavior" produces a unique effect and does not boil down to the sum of "individual" reactions.

'At a certain frequency of an alternating magnetic field, resonance occurs: the maximum response of nanoparticles, the maximum absorption of energy by them and, consequently, the maximum heating,' Ivanov adds. 'As a result of a computer experiment, we identified two such maxima, for large and small particles, for media with a predominance of the former and the latter. If we applied the Debye formulas in calculating the period and intensity of local heating of the tumor, we would give the opposite prediction and would not get the best necessary effect. Our model shows that, in comparison with the classical Debye formula, the heating maxima should be an order of magnitude smaller, and the effect obtained should be twice as large.'

Now Alexey Ivanov and his colleagues from the German Technical University of Braunschweig are planning to do a series of laboratory experiments to confirm the theory.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Inna Mikhaidarova

Copyright © Ural Federal University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Bosch Sensortec launches ideation community to foster and accelerate innovative IoT applications : Creativity hub for customers, partners, developers and makers February 18th, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Picosun’s ALD encapsulation prevents electronics degradation February 15th, 2019

Magnetism

Spintronics by 'straintronics': Switching superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain February 15th, 2019

TOCHA will take a topological approach to the next generation of electronic, photonic and phononic devices January 31st, 2019

Taking magnetism for a spin: Exploring the mysteries of skyrmions January 23rd, 2019

Cancer

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array January 9th, 2019

The potential of nanomaterials to activate the body's antitumor immune response investigated: Lobachevsky University scientists together with their Belgian colleagues are studying the mechanisms of cell death in photodynamic therapy of neuro-oncological diseases in order to devel December 28th, 2018

Scientists program proteins to pair exactly: Technique paves the way for the creation of protein nanomachines and for the engineering of new cell functions December 21st, 2018

Vitamin E TPGS emulsified vinorelbine bitartrate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN): This article by Dr. Sanjay Singh et al. is published in Current Drug Delivery, Volume 15 , Issue 8 , 2018 December 14th, 2018

Nanomedicine

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA February 14th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize — the world’s largest monetary award for achievement in nanomedicine: An additional $10,000 award will honor a young investigator in nanoscience, nanomedicine February 7th, 2019

Kanazawa University research: Chirality inversion in a helical molecule at controlled speeds February 6th, 2019

Discoveries

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques February 15th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Announcements

Bosch Sensortec launches ideation community to foster and accelerate innovative IoT applications : Creativity hub for customers, partners, developers and makers February 18th, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

Nanobiotechnology

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA February 14th, 2019

Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize — the world’s largest monetary award for achievement in nanomedicine: An additional $10,000 award will honor a young investigator in nanoscience, nanomedicine February 7th, 2019

Kanazawa University research: Chirality inversion in a helical molecule at controlled speeds February 6th, 2019

Disruptive by Design: Nano Now February 1st, 2019

Research partnerships

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials' properties: New system of 'strain engineering' can change a material's optical, electrical, and thermal properties February 11th, 2019

Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2-D material February 8th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project