Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Taking magnetism for a spin: Exploring the mysteries of skyrmions

Skyrmions are nanoscale whirls or vortices of magnetic poles that form lattices within a magnetic material, a type of quasiparticle that can zip across the material, pushed by electrical current.

CREDIT
Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy
Skyrmions are nanoscale whirls or vortices of magnetic poles that form lattices within a magnetic material, a type of quasiparticle that can zip across the material, pushed by electrical current. CREDIT Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Abstract:
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered the relaxation dynamics of a zero-field state in skyrmions, a spinning magnetic phenomenon that has potential applications in data storage and spintronic devices.

Taking magnetism for a spin: Exploring the mysteries of skyrmions

Ames, IA | Posted on January 23rd, 2019

Skyrmions are nanoscale whirls or vortices of magnetic poles that form lattices within a magnetic material, a type of quasiparticle that can zip across the material, pushed by electrical current. Those properties have captured the fascination of scientists, who think the phenomenon could lead to the next big advance in data storage, making digital technology even faster and smaller.

There are some big challenges to overcome, however. Until recently skyrmions were a phenomenon only observed at extreme low temperature. Also, external magnetic forces makes them currently impractical for applications.

"In order to be really useful in a device, these magnetic vortices need to be able to exist without the 'help' of an external magnetic field," said Lin Zhou, a scientist in the Ames Laboratory's Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

With that in mind, she and other researchers at Ames Laboratory investigated FeGe, an iron-germanium magnetic material that has demonstrated skyrmions in the highest temperature ranges to date in crystals with a similar, or B20 structure.

Ames Lab scientists with external collaborators were able to establish a skyrmion lattice in a sample through exposure to magnetic fields and supercooling with liquid nitrogen. With a high resolution microscopy method called Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (L-TEM), the team was able to observe the skyrmion lattice in zero magnetic field, and then observe the decay of the skyrmions as the temperature warmed. This direct observation yielded critical new information about how skyrmions behave and how they revert back to a 'normal' (what scientists call metastable) magnetic state.

"We've stabilized these skyrmions without a magnetic field, and our microscopy techniques allowed us to really see how the vortices change over time, temperature, and magnetic field; we think it provides a very solid foundation for theorists to better understand this phenomenon," Zhou said.

###

The research is further discussed in the paper, "Relaxation Dynamics of Zero-Field Skyrmions over a Wide Temperature Range," authored by Licong Peng, Ying Zhang, Liqin Ke, Tae-Hoon Kim, Qiang Zheng, Jiaqiang Yan, X.-G. Zhang, Yang Gao, Shouguo Wang, Jianwang Cai, Boagen Shen, Robert J. McQueeney, Adam Kaminski, Matthew J. Kramer, and Lin Zhou; and published in Nano Letters.

####

About Ames Laboratory
Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Laura Millsaps

Copyright © Ames Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Announces Closing of Agreement with Takeda November 27th, 2020

Magnetism

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

New type of ultrahigh piezoelectricity in hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics November 20th, 2020

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids November 12th, 2020

Lead-free magnetic perovskites November 6th, 2020

Nano-microscope gives first direct observation of the magnetic properties of 2D materials: Discovery means new class of materials and technologies September 18th, 2020

Laboratories

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer November 17th, 2020

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Machine learning takes on synthetic biology: algorithms can bioengineer cells for you: Berkeley Lab scientists develop a tool that could drastically speed up the ability to design new biological systems September 25th, 2020

Skyrmions

The ICN2 co-leads a roadmap on quantum materials September 29th, 2020

Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage: Army-funded research demonstrates emergent chirality in polar skyrmions for the first time in oxide superlattices May 10th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer November 17th, 2020

Arrowhead Interim Clinical Data Demonstrate ARO-AAT Treatment Improved Multiple Biomarkers of Alpha-1 Liver Disease November 13th, 2020

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Face mask aims to deactivate virus to protect others: Antiviral layer attacks respiratory droplets to make mask wearer less infectious October 30th, 2020

Possible Futures

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Spintronics

Spintronics advances -- Controlling magnetization direction of magnetite at room temperature: Scientists develop an energy-efficient strategy to reversibly change 'spin orientation' or magnetization direction in magnetite at room temperature November 20th, 2020

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids November 12th, 2020

A four-state magnetic tunnel junction for novel spintronics applications: A novel magnetic tunnel junction which has four resistance states, instead of two states in existing magnetic tunnel junctions, may pave the way to novel spintronics devices, including multi-level magnetic August 21st, 2020

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

Chip Technology

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

Staying ahead of the curve with 3D curved graphene November 20th, 2020

Spintronics advances -- Controlling magnetization direction of magnetite at room temperature: Scientists develop an energy-efficient strategy to reversibly change 'spin orientation' or magnetization direction in magnetite at room temperature November 20th, 2020

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer November 17th, 2020

Discoveries

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles: Tunable coating allows hitch-hiking nanoparticles to slip past the immune system to their target November 27th, 2020

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

Announcements

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project