Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion

(a) (left) Previously proposed quantum circuit. (b) (right) New parallelized quantum circuit. In (b), the complexity of the circuit is reduced drastically.

CREDIT
K. Sugisaki, T. Takui et al./Osaka City University
(a) (left) Previously proposed quantum circuit. (b) (right) New parallelized quantum circuit. In (b), the complexity of the circuit is reduced drastically. CREDIT K. Sugisaki, T. Takui et al./Osaka City University

Abstract:
Quantum computing and quantum information processing technology have attracted attention in recently emerging fields. Among many important and fundamental issues in nowadays science, solving Schroedinger Equation (SE) of atoms and molecules is one of the ultimate goals in chemistry, physics and their related fields. SE is "First Principle" of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, whose solutions termed wave-functions can afford any information of electrons within atoms and molecules, predicting their physicochemical properties and chemical reactions. Researchers from Osaka City University (OCU) in Japan, Dr. K. Sugisaki, Profs. K. Sato and T. Takui and coworkers have found a quantum algorithm enabling us to perform full configuration interaction (Full-CI) calculations for any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion. Full-CI gives the exact numerical solutions of SE, which are one of the intractable problems with any supercomputers. The implementation of such a quantum algorithm contributes to the acceleration of implementing practical quantum computers.

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion

Osaka, Japan | Posted on December 17th, 2018

The paper has been published on December 13th, 2018 in the first issue of Open Access Journal Chemical Physics Letters X.

They said, "As Dirac claimed in 1929 when quantum mechanics was established, the exact application of mathematical theories to solve SE leads to equations too complicated to be soluble [1]. In fact, the number of variables to be determined in the Full-CI method grows exponentially against the system size, and it easily runs into astronomical figures such as exponential explosion. For example, the dimension of the Full-CI calculation for benzene molecule C6H6, in which only 42 electrons are involved, amounts to 1044, which are impossible to be dealt with any supercomputers."

According to the OCU research group, quantum computers can date back to a Feynman's suggestion in 1982 that the quantum mechanics can be simulated by a computer itself built of quantum mechanical elements which obey quantum mechanical laws. After more than 20 years later, Prof. Aspuru-Guzik, Harvard Univ. (Toronto Univ. since 2018) and coworkers proposed a quantum algorithm capable of calculating the energies of atoms and molecules not exponentially but polynomially against the number of the variables of the systems, making a breakthrough in the field of quantum chemistry on quantum computers [2].

When Aspuru's quantum algorithm is applied to the Full-CI calculations on quantum computers, good approximate wave-functions close to the exact wave-functions of SE under study are required, otherwise bad wave-functions need an extreme number of steps of repeated calculations to reach the exact ones, hampering the advantages of quantum computing. This problem becomes extremely serious for any open shell systems, which have many unpaired electrons not participating in chemical bonding. The OCU researchers have tackled this problem, one of the most intractable issues in quantum science, and made a breakthrough in implementing a quantum algorithm generating particular wave-functions termed configuration state functions in polynomial computing time in 2016 [3].

The previously proposed algorithm requires a considerable number of quantum circuit gate operations proportional to the squares of the number of N, which denotes the number of down-spins of the unpaired electrons in the system. Thus, if N increases, the total computing time increases not exponentially but drastically. Additionally, the complexity of the quantum circuits should be reduced for practical usage of the algorithm and quantum programing architecture. A new quantum algorithm exploits germinal spin functions, termed Serber construction, and reduces the number of the gate operations to only 2N, executing parallelism of the quantum gates. The OCU group said, "This is the first example of practical quantum algorithms, which make quantum chemical calculations realizable on quantum computers equipped with a sizable number of qubits. These implementations empower practical applications of quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers in many important fields."

###

[1] P.A.M. Dirac, Quantum mechanics of many-electron systems. Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 1929, 123, 714-733.

[2] A. Aspuru-Guzik, A. D. Dutoi, P. J. Love, M. Head-Gordon, Science 2005, 309, 1704.

[3] K. Sugisaki, S. Yamamoto, S. Nakazawa, K. Toyota, K. Sato, D. Shiomi, T. Takui, J. Phys. Chem. A 2016, 120, 6459-6466. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpca.6b04932

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Takeji Takui

81-666-055-034

Copyright © Osaka City University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

The lightest shielding material in the world: Protection against electromagnetic interference July 3rd, 2020

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Chemistry

Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst: Rice U. lab unveils catalyst that can break problematic C-F bonds June 22nd, 2020

First measurement of electron energy distributions, could enable sustainable energy technologies June 5th, 2020

Exotic nanotubes move in less-mysterious ways: Rice scientists, engineers show boron nitride’s promise for composites, biomedical applications June 2nd, 2020

MSU scientists solve half-century-old magnesium dimer mystery May 22nd, 2020

Possible Futures

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Quantum Computing

Extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors: Next-generation spintronics candidates: spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs) bridge the zero-gap materials and half-metals June 26th, 2020

Is teleportation possible? Yes, in the quantum world: Quantum teleportation is an important step in improving quantum computing June 19th, 2020

Measuring a tiny quasiparticle is a major step forward for semiconductor technology: Research team publishes latest findings on promising quasiparticles and their interactions June 19th, 2020

Excitons form superfluid in certain 2D combos: Rice University researchers find ‘paradox’ in ground-state bilayers June 15th, 2020

Discoveries

The lightest shielding material in the world: Protection against electromagnetic interference July 3rd, 2020

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses July 3rd, 2020

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Announcements

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool July 3rd, 2020

Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions July 3rd, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology: Substantial increase in the energy conversion efficiency of hydrodynamic power generation via spin currents July 3rd, 2020

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution July 3rd, 2020

Flexible material shows potential for use in fabrics to heat, cool July 3rd, 2020

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics: An international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers July 3rd, 2020

Charcoal a weapon to fight superoxide-induced disease, injury: Nanomaterials soak up radicals, could aid treatment of COVID-19 July 2nd, 2020

The nature of nuclear forces imprinted in photons June 30th, 2020

A Tremendous Recognition’ Engineer Jonathan Klamkin earns prestigious award from DARPA June 23rd, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project