Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > New technology aiming to improve trueness in the piezoelectric microscopy characterization of ceramic materials

Side view of the two types of AFM probes used. The one at the right is a ultra-
long tip which diminish the electrostatic interaction between the cantilever and the sample.
Compared to the standard tip-which is images at the right side, the taller tip provides a
cleaner piezoresponse signal in order to acquire the piezoelectric response of the material.
Side view of the two types of AFM probes used. The one at the right is a ultra- long tip which diminish the electrostatic interaction between the cantilever and the sample. Compared to the standard tip-which is images at the right side, the taller tip provides a cleaner piezoresponse signal in order to acquire the piezoelectric response of the material.

Abstract:
A team of researchers from ICMAB has proved that unconventional AFM probes are suitable
to acquire a trueness piezoelectric signal in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy. The work
entitles “Diminish electrostatic in piezoresponse force microscopy through longer or
ultra-stiff tips” published in the prestigious scientific journal Applied Surface
Science( https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1WNqWcXa~oZkP )

New technology aiming to improve trueness in the piezoelectric microscopy characterization of ceramic materials

Barcelona, Spain | Posted on January 26th, 2018

Piezoresponse Force Microscopy is a strongly used characterization technique in the world
of piezoelectrics. Each year almost 300 manuscripts included this technique in their
research, while piezoelectric community publishes more than 5000 papers yearly.

In this work researchers test almost every single AFM conductive probe available in the
market using a novel method that quantifies the electrostatic contribution in their
measurements. The method relies into solving the mathematical expression called
“correlation function” that describes the mathematical operations that a lock-in amplifier
performs to acquire the signals. After the theoretical description, the same sample is studies
with different AFM tips available in the market, through the use of two distinct type of tests.

In the first test, the researchers increment the piezoelectric signal, while maintaining
constant the electrostatic contribution. By doing this, the mount of signal coming from
piezoelectricity increases, and hence, the changes in the final results a dramatically different.
From this test, it is found that longer tips provide the cleaner signal from the overall set of
probes used. These results are confirmed through the use of independent experiments that
corroborates the first results.

The implementation of this solution to the worldwide scientific community is immediate and
can be used in absolutely any AFM manufacturer, which expands the importance and
implications of this research.

####

Contacts:
Andres Gomez
ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB
Phone: 677602367
Fax: 677602367

Copyright © Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

More info:

Related News Press

News and information

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

At the water’s edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid–liquid interface: Scientists find a simple way to produce heterolayer coordination nanosheets, expanding the diversity of 2D materials July 22nd, 2022

Imaging

An artificial intelligence probe help see tumor malignancy July 1st, 2022

Snapshot measurement of single nanostructure’s circular dichroism March 25th, 2022

Better understanding superconductors with Higgs spectroscopy Prof. Stefan Kaiser from TU Dresden awarded ERC Consolidator Grant March 18th, 2022

Turning any camera into a polarization camera: Metasurface attachment can be used with almost any optical system, from machine vision cameras to telescopes March 18th, 2022

Discoveries

HKU physicists found signatures of highly entangled quantum matter July 22nd, 2022

How different cancer cells respond to drug-delivering nanoparticles: The findings of a large-scale screen could help researchers design nanoparticles that target specific types of cancer July 22nd, 2022

The best semiconductor of them all? Researchers have found a material that can perform much better than silicon. The next step is finding practical and economic ways to make it July 22nd, 2022

Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene July 22nd, 2022

Announcements

Quantum computer works with more than zero and one: Quantum digits unlock more computational power with fewer quantum particles July 22nd, 2022

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene July 22nd, 2022

Quantum computer works with more than zero and one: Quantum digits unlock more computational power with fewer quantum particles July 22nd, 2022

Biology’s hardest working pigments and ‘MOFs’ might just save the climate: A range of processes that currently depend on fossil fuels but are really hard to electrify will depend on the development of genuinely clean fuels, and for that to happen, much more efficient catalysts wi July 22nd, 2022

Generating power where seawater and river water meet July 22nd, 2022

Tools

Atomic level deposition to extend Moore’s law and beyond July 15th, 2022

Nano-rust: Smart additive for autonomous temperature control: FAU researchers develop a new, versatile method for temperature monitoring in materials July 8th, 2022

New technology helps reveal inner workings of human genome June 24th, 2022

Snapshot measurement of single nanostructure’s circular dichroism March 25th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project