Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determination

Trumpet-shaped nanowires with a length of about 10 micrometers are coupled to quantum dots located at their bases. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers by changing the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dots. The arrows are important for fabrication and help to locate the nanowires.
CREDIT
Grenoble Alps University
Trumpet-shaped nanowires with a length of about 10 micrometers are coupled to quantum dots located at their bases. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers by changing the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dots. The arrows are important for fabrication and help to locate the nanowires. CREDIT Grenoble Alps University

Abstract:
Scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of the nanowire can be influenced by excitation of the quantum dot with a laser. Nature Communications published the results.

Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determination

Basel, Switzerland | Posted on July 14th, 2017

Professor Richard Warburton and Argovia Professor Martino Poggio's teams in the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel worked with colleagues from Grenoble Alps University and the Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in Grenoble to couple a microscopic mechanical resonator with a nano-scale quantum dot. They used nanowires made of gallium arsenide that are about 10 micrometers long and have a diameter of a few micrometers at the top. The wires taper sharply downwards and therefore look like tiny trumpets arranged on the substrate. Near the base, which is only about 200 nanometers wide, the scientists placed a single quantum dot that can emit individual light particles (photons).

Excitations lead to strains

If the nanowire oscillates back and forth due to thermal or electrical excitation, the relatively large mass at the wide end of the nano-trumpet produces large strains in the wire that affect the quantum dot at the base. The quantum dots are squeezed together and pulled apart; as a result, the wavelength and thus the color of the photons emitted by the quantum dot change. Although the changes are not particularly large, sensitive microscopes with very stable lasers - specifically developed in Basel for such measurements - are capable of precise detection of the wavelength changes. The researchers can use the shifted wavelengths to detect the motion of the wire with a sensitivity of only 100 femtometers. They expect that by exciting the quantum dot with a laser, the oscillation of the nanowire can be increased or decreased as desired.

Potential uses in sensor and information technology

"We are particularly fascinated by the fact that a link between objects of such different sizes is possible," says Warburton. There are also various potential applications for this mutual coupling. "For example, we can use these coupled nanowires as sensitive sensors to analyze electrical or magnetic fields," explains Poggio, who is investigating the possible applications with his team. "It may also be possible to place several quantum dots on the nanowire, to use the motion to link them together and so pass on quantum information," adds Warburton, whose group focuses on the diverse use of quantum dots in photonics.

Artificial atoms with special properties

Quantum dots are nanocrystals, and are also known as artificial atoms because they behave similarly to atoms. With a typical extent of 10 to 100 nanometers, they are significantly larger than actual atoms. Their size and shape, as well as the number of electrons, can vary. The electrons' freedom of movement in the quantum dots is significantly restricted; the resulting quantum effects give them very special optical, magnetic and electrical properties. For example, quantum dots are able to emit individual light particles (photons) after excitation, which can then be detected using a tailor-made laser microscope.

###

Original source

Mathieu Munsch, Andreas V. Kuhlmann, Davide Cadeddu, Jean-Michel
Gérard, Julien Claudon, Martino Poggio, and Richard J. Warburton
Resonant driving of a single photon emitter embedded in a mechanical oscillator
Nature Communications (2017) | DOI: s41467-017-00097-3

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Olivia Poisson

Copyright © University of Basel

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

Park Systems Announces Grand Opening Ceremony for Their New Office in Beijing China November 19th, 2018

Bosch provides customized IoT and Industry 4.0 solutions: Bosch Mondeville and Bosch Connected Devices and Solutions collaborate to meet a wide variety of customer requirements November 16th, 2018

Imaging

Park Systems Announces Grand Opening Ceremony for Their New Office in Beijing China November 19th, 2018

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria: Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3-D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution November 16th, 2018

Discoveries

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria: Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3-D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution November 16th, 2018

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures: Rice U. invention can use fluorescing carbon nanotubes to reveal stress in aircraft, structures November 15th, 2018

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump: Rice scientists combine graphene foam, epoxy into tough, conductive composite November 14th, 2018

Announcements

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

Park Systems Announces Grand Opening Ceremony for Their New Office in Beijing China November 19th, 2018

Bosch provides customized IoT and Industry 4.0 solutions: Bosch Mondeville and Bosch Connected Devices and Solutions collaborate to meet a wide variety of customer requirements November 16th, 2018

GaN Rising: UC Santa Barbara electrical and computer engineering professor Umesh Mishra to deliver 63rd Annual Faculty Research Lecture November 16th, 2018

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria: Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3-D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution November 16th, 2018

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures: Rice U. invention can use fluorescing carbon nanotubes to reveal stress in aircraft, structures November 15th, 2018

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump: Rice scientists combine graphene foam, epoxy into tough, conductive composite November 14th, 2018

Tools

Park Systems Announces Grand Opening Ceremony for Their New Office in Beijing China November 19th, 2018

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria: Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3-D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution November 16th, 2018

Nanometrics Completes Acquisition of 4D Technology Corporation: The addition of Dynamic Interferometry® expands process control technology solutions November 16th, 2018

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures: Rice U. invention can use fluorescing carbon nanotubes to reveal stress in aircraft, structures November 15th, 2018

Quantum Dots/Rods

Machine learning helps improving photonic applications September 28th, 2018

A Novel Graphene Quantum Dot Structure Takes the Cake August 24th, 2018

Individual quantum dots imaged in 3-D for first time February 28th, 2018

Moving nanoparticles using light and magnetic fields January 25th, 2018

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

GaN Rising: UC Santa Barbara electrical and computer engineering professor Umesh Mishra to deliver 63rd Annual Faculty Research Lecture November 16th, 2018

European Commission Project Creates Pilot Line for Companies to Develop Mid-Infrared Devices: Companies Can Submit Proposals for Possible Matching Funds To Help Develop Prototypes November 13th, 2018

Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: ‘electron quantum metamaterials:’ UC Riverside’s Nathaniel Gabor and colleague formulate a vision for the field in a perspective article November 5th, 2018

Research partnerships

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump: Rice scientists combine graphene foam, epoxy into tough, conductive composite November 14th, 2018

The National Graphene Association Is Excited To Announce A New Affiliate Partnership With Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) November 7th, 2018

2-D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research: Scientists say the tiny 'spins' of electrons show potential to one day support next-generation innovations in many fields October 31st, 2018

Tiny light detectors work like gecko ears October 30th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project