Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Could black phosphorus be the next silicon? New material could make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, research suggests

This is a schematic of the "puckered honeycomb" crystal structure of black phosphorus.
CREDIT: Vahid Tayari/McGill University
This is a schematic of the "puckered honeycomb" crystal structure of black phosphorus.

CREDIT: Vahid Tayari/McGill University

Abstract:
As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Université de Montréal adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon? New material could make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, research suggests

Montreal, Canada | Posted on July 7th, 2015

In a study published today in Nature Communications, the researchers report that when electrons move in a phosphorus transistor, they do so only in two dimensions. The finding suggests that black phosphorus could help engineers surmount one of the big challenges for future electronics: designing energy-efficient transistors.

"Transistors work more efficiently when they are thin, with electrons moving in only two dimensions," says Thomas Szkopek, an associate professor in McGill's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and senior author of the new study. "Nothing gets thinner than a single layer of atoms."

In 2004, physicists at the University of Manchester in the U.K. first isolated and explored the remarkable properties of graphene -- a one-atom-thick layer of carbon. Since then scientists have rushed to to investigate a range of other two-dimensional materials. One of those is black phosphorus, a form of phosphorus that is similar to graphite and can be separated easily into single atomic layers, known as phosphorene.

Phosphorene has sparked growing interest because it overcomes many of the challenges of using graphene in electronics. Unlike graphene, which acts like a metal, black phosphorus is a natural semiconductor: it can be readily switched on and off.

"To lower the operating voltage of transistors, and thereby reduce the heat they generate, we have to get closer and closer to designing the transistor at the atomic level," Szkopek says. "The toolbox of the future for transistor designers will require a variety of atomic-layered materials: an ideal semiconductor, an ideal metal, and an ideal dielectric. All three components must be optimized for a well designed transistor. Black phosphorus fills the semiconducting-material role."

The work resulted from a multidisciplinary collaboration among Szkopek's nanoelectronics research group, the nanoscience lab of McGill Physics Prof. Guillaume Gervais, and the nanostructures research group of Prof. Richard Martel in Université de Montréal's Department of Chemistry.

To examine how the electrons move in a phosphorus transistor, the researchers observed them under the influence of a magnetic field in experiments performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL, the largest and highest-powered magnet laboratory in the world. This research "provides important insights into the fundamental physics that dictate the behavior of black phosphorus," says Tim Murphy, DC Field Facility Director at the Florida facility.

"What's surprising in these results is that the electrons are able to be pulled into a sheet of charge which is two-dimensional, even though they occupy a volume that is several atomic layers in thickness," Szkopek says. That finding is significant because it could potentially facilitate manufacturing the material -- though at this point "no one knows how to manufacture this material on a large scale."

"There is a great emerging interest around the world in black phosphorus," Szkopek says. "We are still a long way from seeing atomic layer transistors in a commercial product, but we have now moved one step closer."

###

This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, the Fonds de recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies, Le regroupement québécois sur les matériaux de pointe, and the Canada Research Chairs program. A portion of the work was performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory which is supported by the National Science Foundation, the State of Florida and the U.S. Department of Energy.

"Two-dimensional magnetotransport in a black phosphorus naked quantum well", V. Tayari et al, published online in Nature Communications, July 7, 2015. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms8702

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Chris Chipello

514-398-4201
http://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/
http://twitter.com/McGilluMedia

Prof. Thomas Szkopek
Dept of Electrical and Computer Engineering
McGill University


William Raillant-Clark
International Press Attaché
Université de Montréal
Tel.: 514 343-7593

Copyright © McGill University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Laboratories

Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Shedding new light on the charging of lithium-ion batteries November 1st, 2019

New drug-delivery technology promises efficient, targeted cancer treatment October 22nd, 2019

Physics

Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation November 1st, 2019

Super-strong magnetic supercrystals can assemble themselves October 25th, 2019

Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals: Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed a versatile framework for studying periodically driven systems, providing a unifying platform to explore so-called 'time crystals' in both the classical and the quantum regime September 20th, 2019

Graphene/ Graphite

Borophene on silver grows freely into an atomic ‘skin’: Rice scientists lead effort to improve manufacture of valuable 2D material October 1st, 2019

Physicists found weak spots in ceramic/graphene composites: Physicists found out the structures in nanomaterials made of ceramic and graphene plates, in which cracks appear most frequently September 27th, 2019

The future of materials with graphene nanotubes starts in Japan September 19th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Chip Technology

Electrifying science: New study describes conduction through proteins November 1st, 2019

Scientists tame Josephson vortices November 1st, 2019

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Combination of Nanometrics and Rudolph Technologies to Create Onto Innovation October 16th, 2019

Discoveries

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor November 8th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Announcements

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project