Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Quantum teleportation on a chip: A significant step towards ultra-high speed quantum computers

The experimental setup of quantum teleportation performed in 2013 is pictured. The experimental setup shows an optical table with a size of 4.2 meters by 1.5 meters on which optical instruments such as mirrors and lenses are arranged to guide laser beams. Over 500 mirrors and lenses were used in this experiment.
CREDIT: Centre for Quantum Photonics at the University of Bristol
The experimental setup of quantum teleportation performed in 2013 is pictured. The experimental setup shows an optical table with a size of 4.2 meters by 1.5 meters on which optical instruments such as mirrors and lenses are arranged to guide laser beams. Over 500 mirrors and lenses were used in this experiment.

CREDIT: Centre for Quantum Photonics at the University of Bristol

Abstract:
The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device Technology Laboratories. These results pave the way to developing ultra-high-speed quantum computers and strengthening the security of communication.

Quantum teleportation on a chip: A significant step towards ultra-high speed quantum computers

Bristol, UK | Posted on April 1st, 2015

Qubits (quantum bits) are sensitive quantum versions of today's computer 0's and 1's (bits) and are the foundation of quantum computers. Photons are particles of light and they are a promising way to implement excellent qubits. One of the most important tasks is to successfully enable quantum teleportation, which transfers qubits from one photon to another. However, the conventional experimental implementation of quantum teleportation fills a laboratory and requires hundreds of optical instruments painstakingly aligned, a far cry from the scale and robustness of device required in a modern day computer or handheld device.

In 2013, Professor Furusawa and his colleagues succeeded in realising perfect quantum teleportation, however, this required a set-up covering several square metres; took many months to build, and reached the limit in terms of scalability. New research at the University of Bristol led by Professor Jeremy O'Brien has taken those optical circuits and implemented them on to a silicon microchip measuring just a few millimetres (0.0001 square metres) using state-of-the-art nano-fabrication methods. This is the first time quantum teleportation has been demonstrated on a silicon chip and the result has radically solved the problem of scalability. The team of researchers have taken a significant step closer towards their ultimate goal of integrating a quantum computer into a photonic chip.

While there has been significant progress in current computing technology, its performance is now reaching the fundamental limit of classical physics. On the other hand, it has been predicted that principles of quantum mechanics will enable the development of ultra-secure quantum communication and ultra-powerful quantum computers, overcoming the limit of current technologies. One of the most important steps in achieving this is to establish technologies for quantum teleportation (transferring signals of quantum bits in photons from a sender to a receiver at a distance). The implementation of teleportation on to a micro-chip is an important building block unlocking the potential for practical quantum technologies.

Professor Akira Furusawa from the University of Tokyo said: "This latest achievement enables us to perform the perfect quantum teleportation with a photonic chip. The next step is to integrate whole the system of quantum teleportation."

Professor Jeremy O'Brien, Director of the Centre for Quantum Photonics at the University of Bristol, who led the Bristol elements of the research, said: "Being able to replicate an optical circuit which would normally require a room sized optical table on a photonic chip is a hugely significant achievement. In effect, we have reduced a very complex quantum optical system by ten thousand in size."

The research is published this week in Nature Photonics.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Joanne Fryer

44-011-733-17276

Copyright © University of Bristol

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Paper: 'Continuous-variable entanglement on a chip' by G. Masada, K. Miyata, A. Politi, T. Hashimoto, J. L. O'Brien and A. Furusawa in Nature Photonics:

Related News Press

News and information

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Hosts R&D Day on Emerging Pipeline of RNAi Therapeutics October 18th, 2019

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

Physics

Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals: Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed a versatile framework for studying periodically driven systems, providing a unifying platform to explore so-called 'time crystals' in both the classical and the quantum regime September 20th, 2019

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

In a quantum future, which starship destroys the other? Quantum physicists blur the lines of cause and effect, illustrating how a sequence of events can flip and co-exist at the same time August 23rd, 2019

Studying quantum phenomena in magnetic systems to understand exotic states of matter August 21st, 2019

Chip Technology

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Combination of Nanometrics and Rudolph Technologies to Create Onto Innovation October 16th, 2019

Do you Kyoto? World-leading companies share their approaches to environmentally friendly business at NAUM’19 October 14th, 2019

PROPHESEE Joins IRT Nanoelec 3D Integration Program Will Work with CEA-Leti, STMicroelectronics, Mentor, EVG, and SET to Develop New 3D Event-Based Vision System October 14th, 2019

Quantum Computing

Machine learning at the quantum lab September 27th, 2019

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals: Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed a versatile framework for studying periodically driven systems, providing a unifying platform to explore so-called 'time crystals' in both the classical and the quantum regime September 20th, 2019

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

Discoveries

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought: Non-antibacterial nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria October 17th, 2019

Announcements

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Hosts R&D Day on Emerging Pipeline of RNAi Therapeutics October 18th, 2019

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought: Non-antibacterial nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria October 17th, 2019

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed: Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT October 11th, 2019

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Researchers synthesize 'impossible' superconductor October 3rd, 2019

Trapping and moving tiny particles using light September 24th, 2019

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

Nano bulb lights novel path: Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source September 20th, 2019

Quantum nanoscience

CCNY physicists score double hit in LED research September 27th, 2019

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

Uncovering the hidden “noise” that can kill qubits: New detection tool could be used to make quantum computers robust against unwanted environmental disturbances September 17th, 2019

Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries September 6th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project