Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

An artist’s view of a carbon nanotube inserted in a plasma membrane of a cell. The nanotube forms a nanoscale tunnel in the membrane and the image shows a single long strand of DNA passing through that tunnel.
An artist’s view of a carbon nanotube inserted in a plasma membrane of a cell. The nanotube forms a nanoscale tunnel in the membrane and the image shows a single long strand of DNA passing through that tunnel.

Abstract:
A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA.

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Livermore, CA | Posted on October 29th, 2014

These carbon nanotube "porins" have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Nanotube porins eventually could be used to deliver drugs to the body, serve as a foundation of novel biosensors and DNA sequencing applications, and be used as components of synthetic cells.

Researchers have long been interested in developing synthetic analogs of biological membrane channels that could replicate high efficiency and extreme selectivity for transporting ions and molecules that are typically found in natural systems. However, these efforts always involved problems working with synthetics and they never matched the capabilities of biological proteins.

Unlike taking a pill which is absorbed slowly and is delivered to the entire body, carbon nanotubes can pinpoint an exact area to treat without harming the other organs around.

"Many good and efficient drugs that treat diseases of one organ are quite toxic to another," said Aleksandr Noy, an LLNL biophysicist who led the study and is the senior author on the paper appearing in the Oct. 30 issue of the journal, Nature. "This is why delivery to a particular part of the body and only releasing it there is much better."

The Lawrence Livermore team, together with colleagues at the Molecular Foundry at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Merced and Berkeley campuses, and University of Basque Country in Spain created a new type of a much more efficient, biocompatible membrane pore channel out of a carbon nanotube (CNT) -- a straw-like molecule that consists of a rolled up graphene sheet.

This research showed that despite their structural simplicity, CNT porins display many characteristic behaviors of natural ion channels: they spontaneously insert into the membranes, switch between metastable conductance states, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced blockades. The team also found that, just like in the biological channels, local channel and membrane charges could control the ionic conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins.

"We found that these nanopores are a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating biosensors," Noy said. "We are thinking about CNT porins as a first truly versatile synthetic nanopore that can create a range of applications in biology and materials science."

"Taken together, our findings establish CNT porins as a promising prototype of a synthetic membrane channel with inherent robustness toward biological and chemical challenges and exceptional biocompatibility that should prove valuable for bionanofluidic and cellular interface applications," said Jia Geng, a postdoc who is the first co-author of the paper.

Kyunghoon Kim, a postdoc and another co-author, added: "We also expect that our CNT porins could be modified with synthetic 'gates' to dramatically alter their selectivity, opening up exciting possibilities for their use in synthetic cells, drug delivery and biosensing."

###

Other LLNL researchers include Ramya Tunuguntla, Kang Rae Cho, Dayannara Munoz and Morris Wang. The team members performed some of the work at the Molecular Foundry DOE user facility as a part of its user project.

####

About DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
ounded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (http://www.llnl.gov) provides solutions to our nation's most important national security challenges through innovative science, engineering and technology. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Anne Stark

925-422-9799

Copyright © DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

Laboratories

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Synthetic Biology

SUWA: A hyperstable artificial protein that does not denature in high temperatures above 100°C February 28th, 2020

WSU researchers develop new technique to understand biology at the nanoscale November 7th, 2018

Rice U. announces $82 million in strategic research initiatives: Faculty, programs will expand in neuroengineering, synthetic biology, physical biology October 16th, 2018

Nanoscience and the future of healthcare kick off first day of ACS national meeting in Boston: Presidential events highlight safety, diversity and groundbreaking research August 2nd, 2018

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball: Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials May 26th, 2020

Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world May 21st, 2020

Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor: Scientists previously observed this peculiar behavior in other materials whose ability to conduct electricity without energy loss cannot be explained by standard theoretical frameworks May 19th, 2020

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Oil & gas and automotive sectors will benefit from durable polymers with graphene nanotubes May 14th, 2020

OCSiAl becomes the largest European supplier of single wall carbon nanotubes with its upgraded REACH registration April 23rd, 2020

Double-walled nanotubes have electro-optical advantages :Rice University calculations show they could be highly useful for solar panels March 27th, 2020

Groovy key to nanotubes in 2D: Why do carbon nanotubes line up? They're in a groove March 16th, 2020

Nanomedicine

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity: Rice University engineers adapt 2D ‘sandwich’ for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy May 15th, 2020

Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers: Researchers have developed a completely new method for twisting atomically thin materials, paving the way for applications of 'twistronics' based on tunable 2D materials May 12th, 2020

Sensors

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries May 22nd, 2020

Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials: Study co-led by Berkeley Lab reveals how wavelike plasmons could power up a new class of sensing and photochemical technologies at the nanoscale May 15th, 2020

Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers: Researchers have developed a completely new method for twisting atomically thin materials, paving the way for applications of 'twistronics' based on tunable 2D materials May 12th, 2020

MOF material offers optical sensing of NO2 pollutant for air quality measurements April 30th, 2020

Discoveries

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Announcements

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Nanobiotechnology

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity: Rice University engineers adapt 2D ‘sandwich’ for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy May 15th, 2020

Chemistry breakthrough could speed up drug development: Scientists have successfully developed a new technique to reliably grow crystals of organic soluble molecules from nanoscale droplets, unlocking the potential of accelerated new drug development May 8th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project