Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Researchers improve performance of III-V nanowire solar cells on graphene: Imagine a field of small wires—standing at attention like a tiny field of wheat—gathering the Sun’s rays as the first step in solar energy conversion

A dense array of nanowires grown directly on graphene. The insets show a higher magnification SEM view of the array and a STEM image of a single, axially heterostructured InGaAs/InAs nanowire.
A dense array of nanowires grown directly on graphene. The insets show a higher magnification SEM view of the array and a STEM image of a single, axially heterostructured InGaAs/InAs nanowire.

Abstract:
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have achieved new levels of performance for seed-free and substrate-free arrays of nanowires from class of materials called III-V (three-five) directly on graphene. These compound semiconductors hold particular promise for applications involving light, such as solar cells or lasers.

Researchers improve performance of III-V nanowire solar cells on graphene: Imagine a field of small wires—standing at attention like a tiny field of wheat—gathering the Sun’s rays as the first step in solar energy conversion

Urbana, IL | Posted on March 24th, 2014

"Over the past two decades, research in the field of semiconductor nanowires has helped to reshape our understanding of atomic-scale crystal assembly and uncover novel physical phenomena at the nanometer scale," explained Xiuling Li, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Illinois. In the March 20th issue of Advanced Materials, the researchers present the first report of a novel solar cell architecture based on dense arrays of coaxial p-n junction InGaAs nanowires on InAs stems grown directly on graphene without any metal catalysts or lithographic patterning.

"In this work, we have overcome the surprising structure (phase segregation) and successfully grown single phase InGaAs and demonstrated very promising solar cell performance," explained postdoctoral researcher Parsian Mohseni, first author of the study.

"Depending on the materials, nanowires can be used for functional electronics and optoelectronics applications," Mohseni added. "The main benefits of this III-V photovoltaic solar cell design are that it is fairly low-cost, substrate-free, and has a built-in back side contact, while being conducive to integration within other flexible device platforms."

Li's research group uses a method called van der Waals epitaxy to grow nanowires from the bottom up on a two-dimensional sheet, in this case, graphene. Gases containing gallium, indium, and arsenic are pumped into a chamber where the graphene sheet sits, prompting the nanowires self-assemble, growing by themselves into a dense carpet of vertical wires across the graphene's surface.

In their earlier work (Nano Letters 2013) using a graphene sheet, the researchers discovered that InGaAs wires grown on graphene spontaneously segregate into an indium arsenide (InAs) core with an InGaAs shell around the outside of the wire. To improve the materials' efficiencies for solar power conversion, the researchers bypassed the unique van der Waals epitaxy induced spontaneous phase segregation by inserting InAs segments in between. The resulted ternary InGaAs NW arrays are vertical, non-tapered, controllable in size, height, and doping, and broadly tunable in composition thus energy for monolithic heterogeneous integration with 2D van der Waals sheets including graphene.

Under air mass 1.5 global solar illumination, the core-shell In0.25Ga0.75As (Eg ~ 1.1 eV) nanowire arrays on graphene demonstrate a conversion efficiency of 2.51 %, representing a new record for substrate-free, III-V NW-based solar cells.

"Although InGaAs is far from being the optimum bandgap materials for high efficiency solar cells, the direct epitaxy on graphene platform established here has significant implications for a wide variety of III-V compound semiconductor NW based solar cells on graphene, as well as light emitters and multi-junction tandem solar cells, all of which can be released for flexible applications," Li said.

In addition to Li and Mohseni, postdoctoral researcher Ashkan Behnam, and graduate students Joshua Wood, Xiang Zhao, Ning C. Wang, and Ki Jun Yu, were co-authors of the paper along with professors Angus Rockett and John A. Rogers (materials science), Joseph W. Lyding (electrical and computer engineering), and Eric Pop at Stanford University. Li also is affiliated with the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at Illinois.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Xiuling Li

217-265-6354

Writer:
Rick Kubetz
Engineering Communications Office
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
217/244-7716

Copyright © University of Illinois College of Engineering

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Multi-million pound project to use nanotechnology to improve safety September 4th, 2015

Magnetic wormhole connecting 2 regions of space created for the first time: The device could have applications in medicine, opening up ways to make MRIs more comfortable for patients September 4th, 2015

Tongfang Global and QD Vision Partner to Bring Wide Color Gamut to Global Television Lines: Color IQTM quantum dots help boost company’s focus on superior color reproduction September 3rd, 2015

QEOS and GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Offer Industry’s First CMOS Platform for MillimeterWave Markets: GLOBALSOLUTIONSSM Partnership will enable next-generation wireless technologies for applications in IoT, 5G and automotive September 3rd, 2015

Graphene

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

Developing Component Scale Composites Using Nanocarbons August 26th, 2015

Chip Technology

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Catena Partner to Provide Next-Generation RF Connectivity Solutions for Growing Wireless Markets: Catena Wi-Fi and Bluetooth RF technologies available on GLOBALFOUNDRIES 28nm Super Low Power Process technology September 3rd, 2015

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

Nanometrics to Participate in the Citi 2015 Global Technology Conference August 26th, 2015

Discoveries

Magnetic wormhole connecting 2 regions of space created for the first time: The device could have applications in medicine, opening up ways to make MRIs more comfortable for patients September 4th, 2015

QEOS and GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Offer Industry’s First CMOS Platform for MillimeterWave Markets: GLOBALSOLUTIONSSM Partnership will enable next-generation wireless technologies for applications in IoT, 5G and automotive September 3rd, 2015

Making nanowires from protein and DNA September 3rd, 2015

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

Announcements

Multi-million pound project to use nanotechnology to improve safety September 4th, 2015

Magnetic wormhole connecting 2 regions of space created for the first time: The device could have applications in medicine, opening up ways to make MRIs more comfortable for patients September 4th, 2015

Making nanowires from protein and DNA September 3rd, 2015

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Magnetic wormhole connecting 2 regions of space created for the first time: The device could have applications in medicine, opening up ways to make MRIs more comfortable for patients September 4th, 2015

Making nanowires from protein and DNA September 3rd, 2015

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

Reversible Writing with Light: Self-assembling nanoparticles take their cues from their surroundings September 3rd, 2015

Energy

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

RUSNANOPRIZE Directorate Announces New Deadline for Nominations Submission – September 11, 2015 September 1st, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

Hot electrons point the way to perfect light absorption: Physicists study how to achieve perfect absorption of light with the help of rough ultrathin films September 1st, 2015

Artificial leaf harnesses sunlight for efficient fuel production August 30th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic