Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Atomically Thin Solar Cells

Microscope photograph of WSe2-samples, connected to electrodes
Microscope photograph of WSe2-samples, connected to electrodes

Abstract:
It does not get any thinner than this: The novel material graphene consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms and exhibits very special electronic properties. As it turns out, there are other materials too, which can open up intriguing new technological possibilities if they are arranged in just one or very few atomic layers. Researchers at the Vienna University of Technology have now succeeded for the first time in creating a diode made of tungsten diselenide. Experiments show that this material may be used to create ultrathin flexible solar cells. Even flexible displays could become possible.

Atomically Thin Solar Cells

Vienna, Austria | Posted on March 11th, 2014

Thin Layers are Different

At least since the Nobel Prize in physics was awarded in 2010 for creating graphene, the "two dimensional crystals" made of carbon atoms have been regarded as one of the most promising materials in electronics. In 2013, graphene research was chosen by the EU as a flagship-project, with a funding of one billion euros. Graphene can sustain extreme mechanical strain and it has great opto-electronic properties. With graphene as a light detector, optical signals can be transformed into electric pulses on extremely short timescales.

For one very similar application, however, graphene is not well suited for building solar cells. "The electronic states in graphene are not very practical for creating photovoltaics", says Thomas Mueller. Therefore, he and his team started to look for other materials, which, similarly to graphene, can arranged in ultrathin layers, but have even better electronic properties.

The material of choice was tungsten diselenide: It consists of one layer of tungsten atoms, which are connected by selenium atoms above and below the tungsten plane. The material absorbs light, much like graphene, but in tungsten diselenide, this light can be used to create electrical power.

The World's Thinnest Solar Cells

The layer is so thin that 95% of the light just passes through - but a tenth of the remaining five percent, which are absorbed by the material, are converted into electrical power. Therefore, the internal efficiency is quite high. A larger portion of the incident light can be used if several of the ultrathin layers are stacked on top of each other - but sometimes the high transparency can be a useful side effect. "We are envisioning solar cell layers on glass facades, which let part of the light into the building while at the same time creating electricity", says Thomas Mueller.

Today, standard solar cells are mostly made of silicon, they are rather bulky and inflexible. Organic materials are also used for opto-electronic applications, but they age rather quickly. "A big advantage of two-dimensional structures of single atomic layers is their crystallinity. Crystal structures lend stability", says Thomas Mueller.

The results of the experiments at the Vienna University of Technology have now been published in the journal "Nature Nanotechnology". The research field is extremely competitive: in the same issue of the journal, two more papers are published, in which very similar results are shown. Researchers at the MIT (Cambridge, USA) and at the University of Washington (Seattle, USA) have also discovered the great advantages of tungsten diselenide. There seems to be little doubt that this material will soon play an important role in materials science all over the world, much like graphene has in the last couple of years.

Full bibliographic information
Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode, Andreas Pospischil, Marco M. Furchi, Thomas Mueller, Nature Nanotechnology (2014) doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.14.

####

About Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna
With its eight faculties - mathematics and geo-information, physics, technical chemistry, informatics, civil engineering, architecture and regional planning, mechanical engineering and business science, electrical engineering and information technology – the Vienna University of Technology covers the classic engineering disciplines.

The TU Vienna has a great pool of specialists who are acting in a wide range of different topics in research, teaching and as partners of the economy. More than 2000 scientists do their research and teaching at highly advanced and modern institutes – in summary about 70. Although fundamental research has priority at the TU Vienna applied research is also done. Moreover services are offered as high-tech problem solving and examination expertise for industry and economy. Innovation orientated companies are highly interested in co-operating with the Vienna University of Technology because of its high-tech and high-quality research and its openness for requests of the economy.

The Vienna University of Technology puts great emphasis on co-operation between its own institutes as well as with other universities. Therefore the TU Vienna participates in several European Union (EU) and other research programmes.

The aim of the university was and still is to belong to the best. The effort to reach this aim is also expressed in its mission statement: With the aim of providing technology for people, our mission is to develop scientific excellence and wide-ranging competence in our students.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Bettina Neunteufl
+43 (1) 58801 41025


Further Information:
Prof. Thomas Müller
Photonics Institute
Vienna University of Technology
Gusshausstraße 27-29, 1040 Vienna
T: +43-1-58801-38739

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

New Antibacterial Wound Dressing in Iran Can Display Replacement Time May 22nd, 2015

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Graphene

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Record high sensitive Graphene Hall sensors May 21st, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Discoveries

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

New Antibacterial Wound Dressing in Iran Can Display Replacement Time May 22nd, 2015

Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma May 21st, 2015

Turn that defect upside down: Twin boundaries in lithium-ion batteries May 21st, 2015

Announcements

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

New Antibacterial Wound Dressing in Iran Can Display Replacement Time May 22nd, 2015

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

INSIDDE: Uncovering the real history of art using a graphene scanner May 21st, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma May 21st, 2015

Energy

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

Sandia researchers first to measure thermoelectric behavior by 'Tinkertoy' materials May 20th, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces Official Launch of the Eagle Platinum Tile™ May 19th, 2015

FEI and Weatherford Enter Into Joint Agreement for Advanced Reservoir Characterization Services May 18th, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

Efficiency record for black silicon solar cells jumps to 22.1 percent: Aalto University's researchers improved their previous record by over 3 absolute percents in cooperation with Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya May 18th, 2015

Wearables may get boost from boron-infused graphene: Rice U. researchers flex muscle of laser-written microsupercapacitors May 18th, 2015

Random nanowire configurations increase conductivity over heavily ordered configurations May 16th, 2015

ORNL demonstrates first large-scale graphene fabrication May 14th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project