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Home > Press > Recyclable Catalyst Produced in Iran Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

Abstract:
Iranian researchers from Payam-e Nour University of Qazvin in association with their colleagues from University of Valencia, Spain, produced an easily recyclable catalyst that can be separated from the reaction environment.

Recyclable Catalyst Produced in Iran Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

Tehran, Iran | Posted on February 19th, 2014

The catalyst, synthesized by stabilizing iron oxide nanoparticles on SBA-15 nanoporous silica, can selectively oxidize sulfide to sulfoxide and other organic compounds such as alcohols in the presence of water as a cheap, non-toxic and environmental-friendly solvent. The catalyst can also be used in petroleum, gas and pharmaceutics industries.

In the present study, the researchers investigated selective oxidation of sulfide to sulfoxide without the formation of sulfone as bi-product by using recyclable compound of iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of SBA-15 nanoporous silica as a green catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant at room pressure in the presence of water as solvent.

This research is considered as the first selective oxidation of sulfide to sulfoxide by using a non-homogenous system based on iron in aqueous media.

Results showed that the use of stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of SBA-15 nanoporous silica as a green catalyst with high selectivity significantly decreased the amount of the consumed catalyst to one molar percent, and it also selectively prevented the production of sulfone as a bi-product during the formation of sulfoxide as the main product. The catalyst was easily recyclable and could be repeatedly used due to its high stability and activity.

Results of the research have been published in Advanced Synthesis Catalysis, vol. 353, issue 11-12, August 2011, pp. 2060-2066.

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