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Home > Press > Electronically controlled drugs could minimize side effects

Graphene nanosheets in a thin film, with a small jolt of electricity, provide a promising new way to deliver drugs.
Credit: Evgeny Sergeev/iStock/Thinkstock
Graphene nanosheets in a thin film, with a small jolt of electricity, provide a promising new way to deliver drugs.

Credit: Evgeny Sergeev/iStock/Thinkstock

Abstract:
Potential side effects of many of today's therapeutic drugs can be downright frightening — just listen carefully to a drug commercial on TV. These effects often occur when a drug is active throughout the body, not just where and when it is needed. But scientists are reporting progress on a new tailored approach to deliver medicine in a much more targeted way. The study on these new electronically controlled drugs appears in the journal ACS Nano.

Electronically controlled drugs could minimize side effects

Washington, DC | Posted on February 5th, 2014

Xinyan Tracy Cui and colleagues note that in the lab, "smart" medical implants can now release drugs on demand when exposed to various cues, including ultraviolet light and electrical current. These advances are largely thanks to developments in nanomaterials that can be designed to carry drugs and then release them at specific times and dosages. Researchers have also experimented with loading anti-cancer drugs on thin, tiny sheets of graphene oxide (GO), which have a lot of traits that are useful in drug delivery. But current techniques still require tweaking before they'll be ready for prime time. Cui's team wanted to work out some of the final kinks.

They incorporated GO nanosheets into a polymer thin film that can conduct electricity, loaded it with an anti-inflammatory drug and coated an electrode with it. When they zapped the material with an electric current, they showed that it released the drug consistently in response. They could do this several hundred times. Also, by experimenting with the sizes and thicknesses of the GO sheets, the scientists could change how much drug the nanosheets could carry. Cui said this approach could be useful in treating epilepsy, for example. In that case, medication already lying in wait inside the body could be released at the onset of a seizure.

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The authors acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

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About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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Contacts:
Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042

Xinyan Tracy Cui, Ph.D.
Department of Bioengineering
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15260

Copyright © American Chemical Society

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