Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Nanotech Innovation Keeps Surfaces Clean and Transparent

Abstract:
Hanging hundreds of feet off the ground to wash a skyscraper's windows or pumping water out to a desert solar array to keep its panels and mirrors clean is more than just a hassle—it's an expensive problem with serious ecological implications.

Nanotech Innovation Keeps Surfaces Clean and Transparent

Philadelphia, PA | Posted on December 21st, 2013

A spin-off company from Penn has found a way to solve the problem of keeping surfaces clean, while also keeping them transparent.

Nelum Sciences, created under an UPstart program in Penn's Center for Technology Transfer, has developed a superhydrophobic coating that can be sprayed onto any surface. The water-based solution contains nanoscopic particles that add a nearly invisible layer of roughness to a surface. This increases the contact angle of the material to which these particles are applied.

A contact angle is the angle the edges of a resting drop of liquid make with a surface. When the angle is low, a drop resembles a flattened hemisphere, with edges that are stuck to the surface. But as the angle increases, a drop begins to look more like a ball, until it literally rolls away instead of sticking.

When these balls of liquid roll off a superhydrophobic surface, they pick up any debris they encounter in their paths, keeping a surface clean.

Co-founded in 2011 by Shu Yang, professor of materials science and engineering in Penn's School of Engineering and Applied Science, Nelum Science's coating is based on her nanotechnology research. Fabricating the coating's nanoparticles at sizes smaller than the wavelength of light—the quality that makes them transparent—is the product of cutting-edge laboratory techniques. The company's inspiration, however, came from structures created by nature.

"Some plants, like lotuses, and other biological structures, like butterfly wings, have this kind of nano-roughness to keep them clean and dry," Yang says. "That's why we named the company after the lotus' Latin name, nelumbo."

Other superhydrophobic sprays have recently come on the market, but they give surfaces a hazy, frosted appearance, making them inappropriate for applications where cleanliness is critical, such as windows, lenses, safety goggles, and solar panels.

Text by Evan Lerner
Video by Kurtis Sensenig

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Pennsylvania

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Discoveries

A fast solidification process makes material crackle February 8th, 2016

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

Materials/Metamaterials

A fast solidification process makes material crackle February 8th, 2016

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Graphene is strong, but is it tough? Berkeley Lab scientists find that polycrystalline graphene is not very resistant to fracture February 7th, 2016

Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories: Berkeley Lab researchers part of team that creates new function in tiny protein shell structures February 6th, 2016

Announcements

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Joint Efforts by Iranian, Malaysian Scientists Produce Antibacterial Coatings for Isolated Areas February 4th, 2016

Silicon-based metamaterials could bring photonic circuits February 1st, 2016

Therapeutic Solutions International Licenses Dexosome Clinical Stage Cancer Immunotherapy Product From Gustave Roussy European Cancer Centre: FDA Cleared Immuno-Oncology Technology to Resume Clinical Development for Solid Tumor Patients January 27th, 2016

Light-activated nanoparticles prove effective against antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs' January 19th, 2016

Energy

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Host-guest nanowires for efficient water splitting and solar energy storage February 7th, 2016

February 4th, 2016

Putting silicon 'sawdust' in a graphene cage boosts battery performance: Approach could remove major obstacles to increasing the capacity of lithium-ion batteries January 30th, 2016

Home

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces New Office in Arizona to Service the Company's New Regional and National Home Builders in Arizona and Nevada October 2nd, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Provides Update on PCAOB Audited Financials July 27th, 2015

Solar cells in the roof and nanotechnology in the walls June 16th, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Continues Global Development Focus on Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Applications: Industrial Nanotech Continues Connecting With Manufacturers Who Seek Out Their Patented Thermal Insulation and Protective Coatings June 11th, 2015

Industrial

Nature Materials: Smallest lattice structure worldwide: 3-D lattice with glassy carbon struts and braces of less than 200 nm in diameter has higher specific strength than most solids February 3rd, 2016

New sensors to combat the proliferation of bacteria in very high-humidity environments January 23rd, 2016

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2016 January 21st, 2016

Corrosion-Fighter Tesla NanoCoatings Pioneers 2x1 Wet-on-Wet Process January 20th, 2016

Solar/Photovoltaic

Host-guest nanowires for efficient water splitting and solar energy storage February 7th, 2016

Simplifying solar cells with a new mix of materials: Berkeley Lab-led research team creates a high-efficiency device in 7 steps January 29th, 2016

An alternative to platinum: Iron-nitrogen compounds as catalysts in graphene January 28th, 2016

Scientists provide new guideline for synthesis of fullerene electron acceptors January 28th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic