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Home > Press > Nontoxic Quantum Dot Research Improves Solar Cells: Record power-conversion efficiency at Los Alamos from quantum-dot sensitized photovoltaics

Hunter McDaniel, Los Alamos National Laboratory postdoctoral researcher, works in the laboratory developing next-generation quantum dots that could revolutionize photovoltaic technology. Los Alamos National Laboratory image.
Hunter McDaniel, Los Alamos National Laboratory postdoctoral researcher, works in the laboratory developing next-generation quantum dots that could revolutionize photovoltaic technology.

Los Alamos National Laboratory image.

Abstract:
Solar cells made with low-cost, non-toxic copper-based quantum dots can achieve unprecedented longevity and efficiency, according to a study by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sharp Corporation.

Nontoxic Quantum Dot Research Improves Solar Cells: Record power-conversion efficiency at Los Alamos from quantum-dot sensitized photovoltaics

Los Alamos, NM | Posted on December 10th, 2013

"For the first time, we have certified the performance of a quantum dot sensitized solar cell at greater than 5 percent, which is among the highest reported for any quantum dot solar cell," said Hunter McDaniel, a Los Alamos postdoctoral researcher and the lead author on a paper appearing in Nature Communications this week. "The robust nature of these devices opens up the possibility for commercialization of this emerging low-cost and low-toxicity photovoltaic technology," he noted.

The reported solar cells are based on a new generation of nontoxic quantum dots (not containing either lead or cadmium as do most quantum dots used in solar cells). These dots are based on copper indium selenide sulfide and are rigorously optimized to reduce charge-carrier losses from surface defects and to provide the most complete coverage of the solar spectrum.

"The new solar cells were certified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and demonstrated a record power-conversion efficiency for this type of devices," according to Victor Klimov of Los Alamos, director of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP, casp.lanl.gov/), a DOE Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC). In addition to CASP-EFRC, this research has been also supported via a cooperative research agreement with Sharp Corporation.

The paper, "An integrated approach to realizing high-performance liquid-junction quantum dot sensitized solar cells" is scheduled for online publication in Nature Communications on Dec. 10, 2013.

The paper's authors are Hunter McDaniel, Nikolay S. Makarov, Jeffrey M. Pietryga, and Victor I. Klimov of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, in partnership with Nobuhiro Fuke of the Materials & Energy Technology Laboratory, Sharp Corporation, Japan.

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About Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, The Babcock & Wilcox Company, and URS Corporation for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Nancy Ambrosiano
505.667.0471

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