Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > MIT researchers to play key roles in new Center for Integrated Quantum Materials: Professor Raymond C. Ashoori will serve as co-principal investigator in the Harvard-led effort to develop new devices for quantum computing

Raymond C. Ashoori
Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing Center
Raymond C. Ashoori

Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing Center

Abstract:
MIT physics professor Raymond C. Ashoori and a team of MIT researchers will play key roles of the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials, led by Harvard University and funded with a $20 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center program award.

MIT researchers to play key roles in new Center for Integrated Quantum Materials: Professor Raymond C. Ashoori will serve as co-principal investigator in the Harvard-led effort to develop new devices for quantum computing

Cambridge, MA | Posted on October 2nd, 2013

"The idea is to make structures where quantum mechanics shows up in either electronic or optical signatures," says Ashoori, who will serve as co-principal investigator in the effort to develop a new class of quantum electronic devices and systems that will transform signal processing and computation.

The team will work with graphene, a one-atom thick form of carbon; topological insulators, a class of materials on which electrons move, on the surface, in the directions of their individual electronic spins; and nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond, which can store quantum information and be readily probed optically.

MIT will receive about $1 million a year, for five years. The MIT award will be managed by the Materials Processing Center.

"Ultimately, we would like to integrate our knowledge from these three basic areas into projects that develop on all three ideas," Ashoori says. "There are possibilities for radically different kinds of electronics with these materials. Topological insulators are a newer field where it may be possible to implement strategies for quantum computing and to do some really way out things."

Graphene could potentially replace silicon as the material for future computer processors.

The project's principal investigator is Robert M. Westervelt, the Mallinckrodt Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics at Harvard. Besides Ashoori, other co-principal investigators are Gary L. Harris, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Howard University; and Carol Lynn Alpert, director of strategic projects at the Museum of Science in Boston.

Other MIT researchers involved in the project include Department of Physics faculty Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, Nuh Gedik, Liang Fu, Leonid S. Levitov and Jagadeesh Moodera (senior scientist); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty Tomas Palacios and Jing Kong; and mechanical engineering professor Seth Lloyd.

"What I like about our group from MIT is it's very tight, in that people have considerable overlap in interests," Ashoori says. "Even within MIT, it's a mechanism for bringing us together and new collaborations frequently just happen this way when you are brought together at regular events that are part of a center like this. It just makes things happen, and it also gives people an incentive to make sure that things happen."

The researchers' proposal to NSF was one of three selected from a national competition that started with more than 250 pre-proposals. The project starts Oct. 1.
The project, based at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) also includes a network of four-year colleges, including Wellesley College, Gallaudet University, Olin College and Mount Holyoke College; and six community colleges, including Bunker Hill Community College. The educational component will focus on preparing these students for graduate school.

Rotating seminars will bring students and faculty from the different schools together. "The idea is to reach out to a pretty broad community that stretches us a bit beyond what we normally do in our day-to-day lives," Ashoori says.

There will also be corporate partnerships with BASF Corp. on graphene research, and with Element Six Ltd. and Epitaxial Technologies on diamond growth research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
MIT news
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 11-400
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
617.253.2700
TTY 617.258.9344

Copyright © Massachusetts Institute of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Keeping electric car design on the right road: A closer look at the life-cycle impacts of lithium-ion batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells December 9th, 2016

Further improvement of qubit lifetime for quantum computers: New technique removes quasiparticles from superconducting quantum circuits December 9th, 2016

Chemical trickery corrals 'hyperactive' metal-oxide cluster December 8th, 2016

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D: Up-close, real-time, chemical-sensitive 3-D imaging offers clues for reducing cost/improving performance of catalysts for fuel-cell-powered vehicles and other applications December 8th, 2016

Graphene/ Graphite

Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors December 6th, 2016

Bumpy surfaces, graphene beat the heat in devices: Rice University theory shows way to enhance heat sinks in future microelectronics November 29th, 2016

Uncovering the secrets of friction on graphene: Sliding on flexible graphene surfaces has been uncharted territory until now November 23rd, 2016

2-D material a brittle surprise: Rice University researchers finds molybdenum diselenide not as strong as they thought November 14th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Chemical trickery corrals 'hyperactive' metal-oxide cluster December 8th, 2016

Researchers peer into atom-sized tunnels in hunt for better battery: May improve lithium ion for larger devices, like cars December 8th, 2016

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D: Up-close, real-time, chemical-sensitive 3-D imaging offers clues for reducing cost/improving performance of catalysts for fuel-cell-powered vehicles and other applications December 8th, 2016

Exotic insulator may hold clue to key mystery of modern physics: Johns Hopkins-led research shows material living between classical and quantum worlds December 8th, 2016

Academic/Education

Oxford Nanoimaging report on how the Nanoimager, a desktop microscope delivering single molecule, super-resolution performance, is being applied at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology & Infection November 22nd, 2016

The University of Applied Sciences in Upper Austria uses Deben tensile stages as an integral part of their computed tomography research and testing facility October 18th, 2016

Enterprise In Space Partners with Sketchfab and 3D Hubs for NewSpace Education October 13th, 2016

New Agricultural Research Center Debuts at UCF October 12th, 2016

Quantum Computing

Further improvement of qubit lifetime for quantum computers: New technique removes quasiparticles from superconducting quantum circuits December 9th, 2016

Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified: Scientists invent ground-breaking new method that puts quantum computers within reach December 5th, 2016

Shape matters when light meets atom: Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices December 4th, 2016

Single photon converter -- a key component of quantum internet November 28th, 2016

Announcements

Keeping electric car design on the right road: A closer look at the life-cycle impacts of lithium-ion batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells December 9th, 2016

Further improvement of qubit lifetime for quantum computers: New technique removes quasiparticles from superconducting quantum circuits December 9th, 2016

Researchers peer into atom-sized tunnels in hunt for better battery: May improve lithium ion for larger devices, like cars December 8th, 2016

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D: Up-close, real-time, chemical-sensitive 3-D imaging offers clues for reducing cost/improving performance of catalysts for fuel-cell-powered vehicles and other applications December 8th, 2016

Research partnerships

Further improvement of qubit lifetime for quantum computers: New technique removes quasiparticles from superconducting quantum circuits December 9th, 2016

Researchers peer into atom-sized tunnels in hunt for better battery: May improve lithium ion for larger devices, like cars December 8th, 2016

Exotic insulator may hold clue to key mystery of modern physics: Johns Hopkins-led research shows material living between classical and quantum worlds December 8th, 2016

Deep insights from surface reactions: Researchers use Stampede supercomputer to study new chemical sensing methods, desalination and bacterial energy production December 2nd, 2016

Quantum nanoscience

Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors December 6th, 2016

Shape matters when light meets atom: Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices December 4th, 2016

Trickling electrons: Close to absolute zero, the particles exhibit their quantum nature November 10th, 2016

Scientists set traps for atoms with single-particle precision: Technique may enable large-scale atom arrays for quantum computing November 7th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project