Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Printing innovations provide 10-fold improvement in organic electronics

This image shows a cross-polarized optical micrograph comparing a sample of an organic semiconducting film created without micropillars (top) and with micropillars (bottom) at scales of both one millimeter and 50 micrometers. Note the uniformity of the crystals in the bottom image as compared to in the top image.

Credit: Credit: Y. Diao et al.
This image shows a cross-polarized optical micrograph comparing a sample of an organic semiconducting film created without micropillars (top) and with micropillars (bottom) at scales of both one millimeter and 50 micrometers. Note the uniformity of the crystals in the bottom image as compared to in the top image.

Credit: Credit: Y. Diao et al.

Abstract:
Through innovations to a printing process, researchers have made major improvements to organic electronics - a technology in demand for lightweight, low-cost solar cells, flexible electronic displays and tiny sensors. The printing method is fast and works with a variety of organic materials to produce semiconductors of strikingly higher quality than what has so far been achieved with similar methods.

Printing innovations provide 10-fold improvement in organic electronics

Menlo Park, CA | Posted on June 3rd, 2013

Organic electronics have great promise for a variety of applications, but even the highest quality films available today fall short in how well they conduct electrical current. The team from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have developed a printing process they call FLUENCE—fluid-enhanced crystal engineering—that for some materials results in thin films capable of conducting electricity 10 times more efficiently than those created using conventional methods.

"Even better, most of the concepts behind FLUENCE can scale up to meet industry requirements," said Ying Diao, a SLAC/Stanford postdoctoral researcher and lead author of the study, which appeared today in Nature Materials.

Stefan Mannsfeld, a SLAC materials physicist and one of the principal investigators of the experiment, said the key was to focus on the physics of the printing process rather than the chemical makeup of the semiconductor. Diao engineered the process to produce strips of big, neatly aligned crystals that electrical charge can flow through easily, while preserving the benefits of the "strained lattice" structure and "solution shearing" printing technique previously developed in the lab of Mannsfeld's co-principal investigator, Professor Zhenan Bao of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, a joint SLAC-Stanford institute.

To make the advance, Diao focused on controlling the flow of the liquid in which the organic material is dissolved. "It's a vital piece of the puzzle," she said. If the ink flow does not distribute evenly, as is often the case during fast printing, the semiconducting crystals will be riddled with defects. "But in this field there's been little research done on controlling fluid flow."

Diao designed a printing blade with tiny pillars embedded in it that mix the ink so it forms a uniform film. She also engineered a way around another problem: the tendency of crystals to randomly form across the substrate. A series of cleverly designed chemical patterns on the substrate suppress the formation of unruly crystals that would otherwise grow out of alignment with the printing direction. The result is a film of large, well-aligned crystals.

X-ray studies of the group's organic semiconductors at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) allowed them to inspect their progress and continue to make improvements, eventually showing neatly arranged crystals at least 10 times longer than crystals created with other solution-based techniques, and of much greater structural perfection.

The group also repeated the experiment using a second organic semiconductor material with a significantly different molecular structure, and again they saw a notable improvement in the quality of the film. They believe this is a sign the techniques will work across a variety of materials.

Principal investigators Bao and Mannsfeld say the next step for the group is pinning down the underlying relationship between the material and the process that enabled such a stellar result. Such a discovery could provide an unprecedented degree of control over the electronic properties of printed films, optimizing them for the devices that will use them.

"That could lead to a revolutionary advance in organic electronics," Bao said. "We've been making excellent progress, but I think we're only just scratching the surface."

###

Other study co-authors included researchers from Stanford University's departments of chemistry and chemical and electrical engineering and Nanjing University. The research was supported by the SLAC's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. SSRL is a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the DOE's Office of Science.

Citation: Y. Diao et al., Nature Materials, 02 June 2013 (10.1038/NMAT3650)

####

About DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
SLAC is a multi-program laboratory exploring frontier questions in photon science, astrophysics, particle physics and accelerator research. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. To learn more, please visit http://www.slac.stanford.edu.

DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Bronwyn Barnett

650-926-8580

Scientist Contact:

Zhenan Bao
SLAC
Stanford University

650-723-2419

Stefan Mannsfeld
SLAC

650-926-3173

Copyright © DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

French Institutes IRT Nanoelec and CMP Team up to Offer World’s First Service for Post-process 3D Technologies on Multi-Project-Wafer March 5th, 2015

The George Washington University Opens Science and Engineering Hall, Largest Building of Its Kind in D.C.: Building Represents Significant Investment in Research Programs and Facilities; Commitment to Solve Global Problems, Improve Lives of Millions March 5th, 2015

Anousheh Ansari Wins the National Space Society's Space Pioneer Award for "Service to the Space Community" March 5th, 2015

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

Laboratories

American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry March 5th, 2015

New research could lead to more efficient electrical energy storage March 4th, 2015

Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum: Aerogel catalyst shows promise for fuel cells March 2nd, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Flexible Electronics

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

Display technology/LEDs/SS Lighting/OLEDs

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

New nanowire structure absorbs light efficiently: Dual-type nanowire arrays can be used in applications such as LEDs and solar cells February 25th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

New research could lead to more efficient electrical energy storage March 4th, 2015

Energy-generating cloth could replace batteries in wearable devices March 4th, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

Discoveries

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry March 5th, 2015

Magnetic vortices in nanodisks reveal information: Researchers from Dresden and Jülich use microwaves to read out information from smallest storage devices March 4th, 2015

CiQUS researchers obtain high-quality perovskites over large areas by a chemical method March 4th, 2015

Announcements

The George Washington University Opens Science and Engineering Hall, Largest Building of Its Kind in D.C.: Building Represents Significant Investment in Research Programs and Facilities; Commitment to Solve Global Problems, Improve Lives of Millions March 5th, 2015

Anousheh Ansari Wins the National Space Society's Space Pioneer Award for "Service to the Space Community" March 5th, 2015

Enhanced Graphene Components for Next Generation Racing Yacht March 5th, 2015

Get ready for NanoDays! March 5th, 2015

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks

Maximum Precision in 3D Printing: New complete solution makes additive manufacturing standard for microfabrication February 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly CNSE Researchers and Corporate Partners to Present Forty Papers at Globally Recognized Lithography Conference: SUNY Poly CNSE Research Group Awarded Both ‘Best Research Paper’ and ‘Best Research Poster’ at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2015 forum February 25th, 2015

World’s first compact rotary 3D printer-cum-scanner unveiled at AAAS by NTU Singapore start-up: With production funded by crowdsourcing, the first unit will be delivered to the United States in March February 16th, 2015

3-D printing with custom molecules creates low-cost mechanical sensor February 10th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE