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Home > Press > Scientists reach the ultimate goal -- controlling chirality in carbon nanotubes

This image shows the initial carbon cap formation on Co nanoparticles.

Credit: Esko Kauppinen
This image shows the initial carbon cap formation on Co nanoparticles.

Credit: Esko Kauppinen

Abstract:
An ultimate goal in the field of carbon nanotube research is to synthesise single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled chiralities. Twenty years after the discovery of SWNTs, scientists from Aalto University in Finland, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS in Russia and the Center for Electron Nanoscopy of Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have managed to control chirality in carbon nanotubes during their chemical vapor deposition synthesis.

Scientists reach the ultimate goal -- controlling chirality in carbon nanotubes

Aalto, Finland | Posted on April 29th, 2013

Carbon nanotube structure is defined by a pair of integers known as chiral indices (n,m), in other words, chirality.

Chirality defines the optical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, so controlling it is a key to exploiting their practical applications, says Professor Esko I. Kauppinen, the leader of the Nanomaterials Group in Aalto University School of Science.

Over the years, substantial progress has been made to develop various structure-controlled synthesis methods. However, precise control over the chiral structure of SWNTs has been largely hindered by a lack of practical means to direct the formation of the metal nanoparticle catalysts and their catalytic dynamics during tube growth.

We achieved an epitaxial formation of Co nanoparticles by reducing a well-developed solid solution in CO, reveals Maoshuai He, a postdoctoral researcher at Aalto University School of Chemical Technology.

For the first time, the new catalyst was employed for selective growth of SWNTs, adds senior staff scientist Hua Jiang from Aalto University School of Science.

By introducing the new catalysts into a conventional CVD reactor, the research team demonstrated preferential growth of semiconducting SWNTs (~90%) with an exceptionally high population of (6,5) tubes (53%) at 500 °C. Furthermore, they also showed a shift of the chiral preference from (6,5) tubes at 500 °C to (7, 6) and (9, 4) nanotubes at 400 °C.

These findings open new perspectives both for structural control of SWNTs and for elucidating their growth mechanisms, thus are important for the fundamental understanding of science behind nanotube growth, comments Professor Juha Lehtonen from Aalto University.

This work is financially supported by the CNB-E project in Aalto University through the Multidisciplinary Institute of Digitalization and Energy (MIDE) program and the Aalto Energy Efficiency program project (MOPPI). This work made use of facilities at Nanomicroscopy Center of Aalto University in Finland and at the Center for Electron Nanoscopy at the Technical University in Denmark sponsored by the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation.

####

About Aalto University
Aalto University, Finland is a new multidisciplinary science and art community in the fields of science, economics, and art and design. The University is founded on Finnish strengths, and its goal is to develop as a unique entity to become one of the world's top universities. Aalto University's cornerstones are its strengths in education and research. At the new University, there are 20,000 basic degree and graduate students as well as a staff of 5,000 of which 350 are professors.

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Contacts:
Esko I. Kauppinen

358-405-098-064

Copyright © Aalto University

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The research has been recently published in a new Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports, 3 (2013), 1460.

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