Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > New imaging technology could reveal cellular secrets

This image illustrates the concept for a new type of technology that combines two biological imaging methods - atomic force microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance - to create a new way to study cancer-cell metastasis and other disease-related processes.Purdue University image/ Xin Xu
This image illustrates the concept for a new type of technology that combines two biological imaging methods - atomic force microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance - to create a new way to study cancer-cell metastasis and other disease-related processes.

Purdue University image/ Xin Xu

Abstract:
Atomic Force Microscopy-Coupled Microcoils for Cellular-Scale Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Charilaos Mousoulis,1 Teimour Maleki,2 Babak Ziaie,1,2,3 and Corey P. Neu1,a

1 1Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University

2 2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University

3 Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University

We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 10 3 lm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1H resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra 14 depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level. VC 2013 AIP Publishing LLC. [dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4801318].

New imaging technology could reveal cellular secrets

West Lafayette, IN | Posted on April 25th, 2013

Researchers have married two biological imaging technologies, creating a new way to learn how good cells go bad.

"Let's say you have a large population of cells," said Corey Neu, an assistant professor in Purdue University's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering. "Just one of them might metastasize or proliferate, forming a cancerous tumor. We need to understand what it is that gives rise to that one bad cell."

Such an advance makes it possible to simultaneously study the mechanical and biochemical behavior of cells, which could provide new insights into disease processes, said biomedical engineering postdoctoral fellow Charilaos "Harris" Mousoulis.

Being able to study a cell's internal workings in fine detail would likely yield insights into the physical and biochemical responses to its environment. The technology, which combines an atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance system, could help researchers study individual cancer cells, for example, to uncover mechanisms leading up to cancer metastasis for research and diagnostics.

The prototype's capabilities were demonstrated by taking nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of hydrogen atoms in water. Findings represent a proof of concept of the technology and are detailed in a research paper that appeared online April 11 in the journal Applied Physics Letters. The paper was co-authored by Mousoulis; research scientist Teimour Maleki; Babak Ziaie, a professor of electrical and computer engineering; and Neu.

"You could detect many different types of chemical elements, but in this case hydrogen is nice to detect because it's abundant," Neu said. "You could detect carbon, nitrogen and other elements to get more detailed information about specific biochemistry inside a cell."

An atomic force microscope (AFM) uses a tiny vibrating probe called a cantilever to yield information about materials and surfaces on the scale of nanometers, or billionths of a meter. Because the instrument enables scientists to "see" objects far smaller than possible using light microscopes, it could be ideal for studying molecules, cell membranes and other biological structures.

However, the AFM does not provide information about the biological and chemical properties of cells. So the researchers fabricated a metal microcoil on the AFM cantilever. An electrical current is passed though the coil, causing it to exchange electromagnetic radiation with protons in molecules within the cell and inducing another current in the coil, which is detected.

The Purdue researchers perform "mechanobiology" studies to learn how forces exerted on cells influence their behavior. In work focusing on osteoarthritis, their research includes the study of cartilage cells from the knee to learn how they interact with the complex matrix of structures and biochemistry between cells.

Future research might include studying cells in "microfluidic chambers" to test how they respond to specific drugs and environmental changes.

A U.S. patent application has been filed for the concept. The research has been funded by Purdue's Showalter Trust Fund and the National Institutes of Health.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Writer:
Emil Venere
765-494-4709


Sources:
Corey Neu
765-496-1426


Charilaos "Harris" Mousoulis

Copyright © Purdue University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

Novel Method Found for Connection of Metallic Alloys to Polymers November 23rd, 2014

New research project supports internationalisation in nano-research: Launch of new “Baltic Sea Network” November 22nd, 2014

3rd Iran-Proposed Nano Standard Approved by International Standard Organization November 22nd, 2014

Imaging

Leica Microsystems Presents Universal Hybrid Detector for Single Molecule Detection and Imaging at SfN and ASCB: Leica HyD SMD - the Optimal Detector for Precise and Reliable SMD data November 20th, 2014

NRL Scientists Discover Novel Metamaterial Properties within Hexagonal Boron Nitride November 20th, 2014

Spectral Surface Mapping with Microscopic Resolution: CRAIC Technologies introduces Spectral Surface Mapping™ (S2M™) software November 18th, 2014

Two sensors in one: Nanoparticles that enable both MRI and fluorescent imaging could monitor cancer, other diseases November 18th, 2014

Nanomedicine

New research project supports internationalisation in nano-research: Launch of new “Baltic Sea Network” November 22nd, 2014

Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites November 20th, 2014

Silver Nanoparticles Produced in Iran from Forest Plants Extract November 20th, 2014

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: Protein-engineered cages aid studies of cell functions November 19th, 2014

Discoveries

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

Novel Method Found for Connection of Metallic Alloys to Polymers November 23rd, 2014

NMTI announces breakthrough solutions for HAMR nanoantenna for next-generation ultra-high density magnetic storage November 21st, 2014

Nano Sorbents Able to Remove Pollutions Caused by Oil Derivatives November 20th, 2014

Announcements

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

Novel Method Found for Connection of Metallic Alloys to Polymers November 23rd, 2014

New research project supports internationalisation in nano-research: Launch of new “Baltic Sea Network” November 22nd, 2014

3rd Iran-Proposed Nano Standard Approved by International Standard Organization November 22nd, 2014

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

Novel Method Found for Connection of Metallic Alloys to Polymers November 23rd, 2014

NMTI announces breakthrough solutions for HAMR nanoantenna for next-generation ultra-high density magnetic storage November 21st, 2014

Nano Sorbents Able to Remove Pollutions Caused by Oil Derivatives November 20th, 2014

Tools

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

Leica Microsystems Presents Universal Hybrid Detector for Single Molecule Detection and Imaging at SfN and ASCB: Leica HyD SMD - the Optimal Detector for Precise and Reliable SMD data November 20th, 2014

Nanometrics Announces Upcoming Investor Events November 19th, 2014

Two sensors in one: Nanoparticles that enable both MRI and fluorescent imaging could monitor cancer, other diseases November 18th, 2014

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Dicerna Announces License Agreement with Tekmira to Advance Dicerna’s PH1 Development Program November 17th, 2014

First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood: NanoFlares light up individual cells if breast cancer biomarker is present November 17th, 2014

Ki-Bum Lee Patents Technology To Advance Stem Cell Therapeutics November 13th, 2014

'Direct writing' of diamond patterns from graphite a potential technological leap November 5th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More












ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE