Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New Innovative Nano Sized Metallic Semi-Conductor: Indian researchers have explored the semiconducting nature of lead nanopowder

T. Theivasanthi
T. Theivasanthi

Abstract:
Indian researchers have developed a new metallic semiconductor. The group (Theivasanthi and Alagar), based at Centre for Research and Post Graduate Department of Physics, Ayya Nadar Janaki Ammal College comments: "To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of semiconducting nature of lead nanopowder (Pb). So far, lead metal has been known as a good / super conductor." The researchers have explained the synthesis procedures of this metal powder in their earlier report [Theivasanthi et al, arXiv:1212.5795] and explore its semiconducting properties in current report [Theivasanthi et al, arXiv:1302.1456]. Findings of this study suggests that the synthesized material is an efficient semiconducting material and can be utilized for making solar cells, optoelectronic, power and other semiconductor devices. TEM image of spherical Pb Nanoparticles is in Fig.1. This work throws some light on and helps further research on nano-sized lead powder.

New Innovative Nano Sized Metallic Semi-Conductor: Indian researchers have explored the semiconducting nature of lead nanopowder

India | Posted on February 18th, 2013

It is a well known fact that generally nano-materials have behaviors different from their bulk material. Size and shape provides important control over many of the physical properties (viz., melting point, magnetism, specific heat, conductivity, band gap, etc.), luminescence, optical, chemical and catalytic properties of nanomaterials. The present research has been done, based on these facts and the new nano sized Pb metallic semiconductor has been innovated. Photoluminescence study of the material indicates the emission of photon and suggests presence of bandgap in the material. This confirms semiconducting properties. PL spectra are in Fig.2 & 3.

As a direct bandgap material, the visible light shining on its surface is well absorbed by this material. Also, the large surface area (314 nm2) and high specific surface area (52m2g-1) of this material augments its light absorbance property. Quantum yield value greater than 1 of this material is the result of the gain of energy and it shows possible utilization for heat or photochemical reaction or photo-induced or radiation-induced chain reactions, in which a single photon may trigger a long chain of transformations. These characters will be very useful while applying this semiconductor material in photovoltaic cells.

The researchers have studied band gap values of Pb nanopowder obtained from UV-Vis, PL, Cyclic voltammetry analyses and resistivity values from Four probe analyses results. "Our data clearly indicates the semiconducting nature of Pb nanopowder and its direct bandgap," the researchers comment, adding: "Further research related to electrical behaviors, battery performances etc. of this material are going on."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
T. Theivasanthi

Copyright © SciGuru Science News

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

This research has been published in arXiv of Cornell University:

and:

Related News Press

News and information

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Chip Technology

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Pushing Past Limits: Junkai Jiang receives prestigious Ph.D. Student Fellowship from IEEE Electron Devices Society March 14th, 2019

Nanometrics Announces $80 Million Share Repurchase Program March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Discoveries

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Announcements

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Energy

Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells: Kanazawa University-led researchers layer two different mineral forms of titanium oxide to improve electron flow at the negative electrode for better metal halide perovskite-type solar cells March 2nd, 2019

New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles: Guidelines have the potential to transform the fields of optoelectronics, bio-imaging and energy harvesting March 1st, 2019

Avoiding the Crack of Doom: New imaging technique reveals how mechanical damage begins at the molecular scale February 25th, 2019

High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed: Researchers at Osaka University introduce a new time-resolved microscopy method that allows them to monitor the trajectories of fast-moving charged particles at unprecedented rates February 21st, 2019

Solar/Photovoltaic

Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells: Kanazawa University-led researchers layer two different mineral forms of titanium oxide to improve electron flow at the negative electrode for better metal halide perovskite-type solar cells March 2nd, 2019

High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed: Researchers at Osaka University introduce a new time-resolved microscopy method that allows them to monitor the trajectories of fast-moving charged particles at unprecedented rates February 21st, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Self-assembling nanomaterial offers pathway to more efficient, affordable harnessing of solar power: The new materials produce a singlet fission reaction that creates more and extends the life of harvestable electronic charges January 24th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project