Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Routes towards defect-free graphene

Optical micrograph showing graphene domains formed across grain boundaries.
Optical micrograph showing graphene domains formed across grain boundaries.

Abstract:
A new way of growing graphene without the defects that weaken it and prevent electrons from flowing freely within it could open the way to large-scale manufacturing of graphene-based devices with applications in fields such as electronics, energy, and healthcare.

Routes towards defect-free graphene

Oxford, UK | Posted on February 1st, 2013

A team led by Oxford University scientists has overcome a key problem of growing graphene - a one atom-thick layer of carbon - when using an established technique called chemical vapour deposition, that the tiny flakes of graphene form with random orientations, leaving defects or 'seams' between flakes that grow together.

The discovery, reported in a paper to be published in ACS Nano, reveals how these graphene flakes, known as 'domains', can be lined up by manipulating the alignment of carbon atoms on a relatively cheap copper foil - the atomic structure of the copper surface acts as a 'guide' that controls the orientation of the carbon atoms growing on top of them.

A combination of control of this copper guide and the pressure applied during growth makes it possible to control the thickness of these domains, the geometry of their edges and the grain boundaries where they meet - 'seams' that act as obstacles to the smooth progress of electrons necessary to create efficient graphene-based electrical and electronic devices.

'Current methods of growing flakes of graphene often suffer from graphene domains not lining up,' said Professor Nicole Grobert of Oxford University's Department of Materials who led the work. 'Our discovery shows that it is possible to produce large sheets of graphene where these flakes, called 'domains', are well-aligned, which will create a neater, stronger, and more 'electron-friendly' material.'

In principle the size of the sheet of graphene that can be created is only limited by the size of the copper base sheet.

The Oxford-led team, which includes researchers from Forschungszentrum Juelich Germany, the University of Ioannina Greece, and Renishaw plc, has shown that it is also possible using the new technique to selectively grow bilayer domains of graphene - a double layer of closely packed carbon atoms - which are of particular interest for their unusual electrical properties.

'People have used copper as a base material before, but this is the first time anyone has shown that the many different types of copper surfaces can indeed strongly control the structure of graphene,' said Professor Grobert. 'It's an important step towards finding a way of manufacturing graphene in a controlled fashion at an industrial scale, something that is essential if we are to bridge the gap between fundamental research and building useful graphene-based technologies.'

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
University of Oxford Press Office

44-018-652-83877

Copyright © University of Oxford

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Cima NanoTech Debuts Large Interactive Touch Screens with European Customers at ISE 2016: For the first time in Europe, Cima NanoTech’s wide range of high performance, projected capacitive touch modules are showcased February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Graphene/ Graphite

Composite Pipe Long Term Testing Facility February 10th, 2016

Possible Futures

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

A fast solidification process makes material crackle February 8th, 2016

Chip Technology

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

SUNY Poly and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announce New $500M R&D Program in Albany To Accelerate Next Generation Chip Technology: Arrival of Second Cutting Edge EUV Lithography Tool Launches New Patterning Center That Will Generate Over 100 New High Tech Jobs at SUNY Poly February 9th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

UTHealth research looks at nanotechnology to help prevent preterm birth February 7th, 2016

Discoveries

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Announcements

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Cima NanoTech Debuts Large Interactive Touch Screens with European Customers at ISE 2016: For the first time in Europe, Cima NanoTech’s wide range of high performance, projected capacitive touch modules are showcased February 11th, 2016

Composite Pipe Long Term Testing Facility February 10th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Energy

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Host-guest nanowires for efficient water splitting and solar energy storage February 7th, 2016

February 4th, 2016

Industrial

Nature Materials: Smallest lattice structure worldwide: 3-D lattice with glassy carbon struts and braces of less than 200 nm in diameter has higher specific strength than most solids February 3rd, 2016

New sensors to combat the proliferation of bacteria in very high-humidity environments January 23rd, 2016

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2016 January 21st, 2016

Corrosion-Fighter Tesla NanoCoatings Pioneers 2x1 Wet-on-Wet Process January 20th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic