Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Alternative to fullerenes in organic solar cells - just as exciting

Abstract:
An insight into the properties of fullerene is set to open the door to a new class of electronic acceptors which can be used to build better and cheaper organic solar cells.

Alternative to fullerenes in organic solar cells - just as exciting

Coventry, UK | Posted on December 12th, 2012

Organic solar cells have advanced a great deal since they were first invented nearly 20 years ago, but the fullerene component has remained largely the same and this has had a braking effect on the evolution of the technology.

But now scientists at the University of Warwick have pinpointed an unappreciated property of fullerenes, namely the availability of additional electron accepting states, which could be replicated to create a new class of ‘fullerene mimics'.

Their research is described in a new study in the journal Advanced Materials.

The solar cell industry has been searching for an alternative to fullerenes for some time as they have many drawbacks as electronic acceptors, including a very limited light adsorption and a high cost.

Also, going beyond fullerene derivatives would increase the possible blends that can be considered for organic solar cells.

The University of Warwick scientists, led by Professor Alessandro Troisi in the Department of Chemistry, have discovered that fullerene can accept electrons in a number of excited states, not just in its ground anionic state.

These extra states make the process of electron capture faster and improve the efficiency of the charge separation process.

This particular property is not possessed by chance - it needs to be designed into a material and so any attempt to make a fullerene substitute needs to take this property into account.

Professor Troisi believes this is why several attempts to date by the industry to find a replacement have failed.

However the Warwick scientists have shown that a new class of molecular acceptors with this electronic characteristic can be designed relatively easily, providing a route towards replacing fullerene derivatives in solar cells.

Professor Troisi said: "Finding a replacement to fullerene has eluded the scientific community and the photovoltaics industry for the best part of two decades.

"By pinpointing this particular way in which fullerene behaves, we believe we have found a key which may unlock the door to new replacements for this material.

"Using this knowledge, we are now collaborating with experimentalists at University of Warwick to actively develop fullerene substitutes."

A patent application has been filed and the scientists are keen to work with commercial partners to bring this technology to market.

The study, What makes fullerene acceptors special as electron acceptors in organic solar cells and how to replace them, was co-authored by Alessandro Troisi and Tao Liu from the University of Warwick and was funded by the European Research Council.

Full bibliographic informationAdvanced Materials.

What makes fullerene acceptors special as electron acceptors in organic solar cells and how to replace them

The DOI for this study is 10.1002/adma.201203486.

####

About University of Warwick
The University of Warwick is consistently ranked in the Top Ten UK Universities.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Coventry, United Kingdom, CV4 7AL
+44 024 7652 3523

Anna Blackaby
+44 024 76575910
or +44(0)7785 433155


Professor Alessandro Troisi
+44 (0) 24765 23228

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Quantum teleportation on a chip: A significant step towards ultra-high speed quantum computers April 1st, 2015

So, near and yet so far: Stable HGNs for Raman April 1st, 2015

Two-dimensional dirac materials: Structure, properties, and rarity April 1st, 2015

3-D neural structure guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels April 1st, 2015

Discoveries

Quantum teleportation on a chip: A significant step towards ultra-high speed quantum computers April 1st, 2015

Two-dimensional dirac materials: Structure, properties, and rarity April 1st, 2015

3-D neural structure guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels April 1st, 2015

Light-powered gyroscope is world's smallest: Promises a powerful spin on navigation April 1st, 2015

Announcements

Quantum teleportation on a chip: A significant step towards ultra-high speed quantum computers April 1st, 2015

So, near and yet so far: Stable HGNs for Raman April 1st, 2015

Two-dimensional dirac materials: Structure, properties, and rarity April 1st, 2015

3-D neural structure guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels April 1st, 2015

Energy

Wrapping carbon nanotubes in polymers enhances their performance: Scientists at Japan's Kyushu University say polymer-wrapped carbon nanotubes hold much promise in biotechnology and energy applications March 30th, 2015

Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem: Research team increases material's light emission by twelve times March 29th, 2015

LAMDAMAP 2015 hosted by the University March 26th, 2015

Hong Kong Investors Bullish on Dais Analytic Invest $5.75M, Provide $60M Contract, and Create New Joint Venture Company March 26th, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

Wrapping carbon nanotubes in polymers enhances their performance: Scientists at Japan's Kyushu University say polymer-wrapped carbon nanotubes hold much promise in biotechnology and energy applications March 30th, 2015

Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem: Research team increases material's light emission by twelve times March 29th, 2015

LAMDAMAP 2015 hosted by the University March 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly & M+W Make Major Announcement: Major Expansion To Include M+W Owned Gehrlicher Solar America Corporation That Will Create up to 400 Jobs to Develop Solar Power Plants at SUNY Poly Sites Across New York State March 26th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE