Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Researcher aims to understand one of nature’s strangest secrets - Magnetotactic bacteria

Amy Monnington, PhD researcher.
Amy Monnington, PhD researcher.

Abstract:
PhD researcher, Amy Monnington, is making a key contribution to research that will unlock the understanding of one of the most intriguing processes in nature by looking into the process of Magnetotactic bacteria. These organisms develop membrane-encapsulated nano-particles known as magnetosomes which allow bacteria to orient themselves along the earth's magnetic field lines in order to migrate to more favourable environments.

Researcher aims to understand one of nature’s strangest secrets - Magnetotactic bacteria

Queensgate, UK | Posted on October 16th, 2012

Magnetosomes contain the iron-oxygen composite, magnetite, which is also found in more complex organisms, such as honey bees, salmon and pigeons, and presumed to play a key role in navigation and now, the Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences at the University of Huddersfield, is working on a project which aims for greater understanding of magnetite formation. .

Although magnetotactic bacteria were first discovered in 1975, the production of their magnetite crystals is still not fully understood.

Now, the Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences at the University of Huddersfield is working on a project which aims for greater understanding of magnetite formation. It is the basis of Amy Monnington's PhD thesis and the project, supervised by Dr David Cooke.

She recently presented a paper - Understanding the Biomineralisation of Magnetite within Magnetotactic Bacteria - at the CCP5 Conference that took place at the University of Huddersfield and after graduation has been invited to join the biomineralisation research project.

Its original contribution is to discover how magnetite crystals form within magnetotactic bacteria, with the ultimate aim of understanding biomineralisation processes as a whole to enable commercial production of magnetite and other biominerals.

Numerous commercial applications for magnetite nano-particles have previously been considered, with their use as contrast agents for MRI and tumour specific drug carriers in development.

However, such applications are not commercially viable at present, says Amy.

"This is because the mechanisms of biomineralisation are not completely known, thus the production of magnetite on an industrial scale is time-consuming and costly," she explains.

"We are trying to understand the processes in order to be able to produce the particles more economically."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ian Pitchford
+44 (0) 1484 47 3831

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Animal study shows flexible, dissolvable silicon device promising for brain monitoring: Other applications include post-operative observation for vascular, cardiac, and orthopaedic procedures, finds Penn study May 5th, 2016

Speedy ion conduction in solid electrolytes clears road for advanced energy devices May 5th, 2016

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Clues on the path to a new lithium battery technology: Charging produces highly reactive singlet oxygen in lithium air batteries May 5th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Animal study shows flexible, dissolvable silicon device promising for brain monitoring: Other applications include post-operative observation for vascular, cardiac, and orthopaedic procedures, finds Penn study May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

The intermediates in a chemical reaction photographed 'red-handed' Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have for the first time succeeded in imaging all the steps in a complex organic reaction and have resolved the mechanisms that explain it May 4th, 2016

Nuclear pores captured on film: Using an ultra fast-scanning atomic force microscope, researchers from the University of Basel have filmed 'living' nuclear pore complexes at work for the first time May 3rd, 2016

Discoveries

Animal study shows flexible, dissolvable silicon device promising for brain monitoring: Other applications include post-operative observation for vascular, cardiac, and orthopaedic procedures, finds Penn study May 5th, 2016

Speedy ion conduction in solid electrolytes clears road for advanced energy devices May 5th, 2016

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

Announcements

Speedy ion conduction in solid electrolytes clears road for advanced energy devices May 5th, 2016

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Clues on the path to a new lithium battery technology: Charging produces highly reactive singlet oxygen in lithium air batteries May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic