Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Squeeze light till it hurts on a quantum scale

Professor Howard Wiseman
Professor Howard Wiseman

Abstract:
An international team of physicists has pushed the boundaries on ultra-precise measurement by harnessing quantum light waves in a new way.

Squeeze light till it hurts on a quantum scale

Brisbane, Australia | Posted on September 24th, 2012

It is one thing to be able to measure spectacularly small distances using "squeezed" light, but it is now possible to do this even while the target is moving around.

An Australian-Japanese research collaboration made the breakthrough in an experiment conducted at the University of Tokyo, the results of which have been published in an article, "Quantum-enhanced optical phase tracking" in the prestigious journal, Science.

Leader of the international theoretical team Professor Howard Wiseman, from Griffith University's Centre for Quantum Dynamics (pictured), said this more precise technique for motion tracking will have many applications in a world which is constantly seeking smaller, better and faster technology.

"At the heart of all scientific endeavour is the necessity to be able to measure things precisely," Professor Wiseman said.

"Because the phase of a light beam changes whenever it passes through or bounces off an object, being able to measure that change is a very powerful tool."

"By using squeezed light we have broken the standard limits for precision phase tracking, making a fundamental contribution to science," he said. "But we have also shown that too much squeezing can actually hurt."

Dr Dominic Berry from Macquarie University has been collaborating with Professor Wiseman on the theory of this problem for many years.

"The key to this experiment has been to combine "phase squeezing" of light waves with feedback control to track a moving phase better than previously possible," Dr Berry said.

"Ultra-precise quantum-enhanced measurement has been done before, but only with very small phase changes. Now we have shown we can track large phase changes as well," he said.

Professor Elanor Huntington from UNSW Canberra, who directed the Australian experimental contribution, is a colleague of Professor Wiseman in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.

"By using quantum states of light we made a more precise measurement than is possible through the conventional techniques using laser beams of the same intensity," Professor Huntington said.

"Curiously, we found that it is possible to have too much of a good thing. Squeezing beyond a certain point actually degrades the performance of the measurement, making it less precise than if we had used light with no squeezing."
Participating research organisations: The University of Tokyo, Griffith University, Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (Australian Research Council), University of New South Wales (Canberra), Kyoto University, University of Waterloo (Ontario), Macquarie University, University of Queensland.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Professor Howard Wiseman
Director
Centre Staff
Centre for Quantum Dynamics
Telephone 61 (07) 373 57279
Fax 61 (07) 373 57773

Copyright © Griffith University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Particles from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on personal electronics February 19th, 2017

Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics: Creating integrated circuits just atoms thick February 18th, 2017

Engineers shrink microscope to dime-sized device February 17th, 2017

Francis Alexander Named Deputy Director of Brookhaven Lab's Computational Science Initiative February 16th, 2017

Discoveries

Particles from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on personal electronics February 19th, 2017

Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics: Creating integrated circuits just atoms thick February 18th, 2017

Engineers shrink microscope to dime-sized device February 17th, 2017

Research opens door to smaller, cheaper, more agile communications tech February 16th, 2017

Announcements

Particles from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on personal electronics February 19th, 2017

Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics: Creating integrated circuits just atoms thick February 18th, 2017

Engineers shrink microscope to dime-sized device February 17th, 2017

Francis Alexander Named Deputy Director of Brookhaven Lab's Computational Science Initiative February 16th, 2017

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics: Creating integrated circuits just atoms thick February 18th, 2017

Research opens door to smaller, cheaper, more agile communications tech February 16th, 2017

1,000 times more efficient nano-LED opens door to faster microchips February 5th, 2017

NUS engineers develop low-cost, flexible terahertz radiation source for fast, non-invasive screening: Novel invention presents promising applications in spectroscopy, safety surveillance, cancer diagnosis, imaging and communication February 1st, 2017

Research partnerships

Graphene foam gets big and tough: Rice University's nanotube-reinforced material can be shaped, is highly conductive February 13th, 2017

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Scientists Use New ‘Blood Biopsies’ With Experimental Device to Speed Cancer Diagnosis and Predict Disease Spread: Leading-Edge Research Is Part of National Cancer Moonshot Initiative February 13th, 2017

Highly sensitive gas sensors for volatile organic compound detection February 6th, 2017

UCLA physicists map the atomic structure of an alloy: Researchers measured the coordinates of more than 23,000 atoms in a technologically important material February 3rd, 2017

Quantum nanoscience

The speed limit for intra-chip communications in microprocessors of the future January 23rd, 2017

First experimental proof of a 70 year old physics theory: First observation of magnetic phase transition in 2-D materials, as predicted by the Nobel winner Onsager in 1943 January 6th, 2017

Quantum simulation technique yields topological soliton state in SSH model January 3rd, 2017

Diamonds are technologists' best friends: Researchers from the Lomonosov Moscow State University have grown needle- and thread-like diamonds and studied their useful properties December 30th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project