Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Nano-structures to realise hydrogen’s energy potential

Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou from the School of Chemical Engineering
Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou from the School of Chemical Engineering

Abstract:
For the first time, engineers at the University of New South Wales have demonstrated that hydrogen can be released and reabsorbed from a promising storage material, overcoming a major hurdle to its use as an alternative fuel source.

Nano-structures to realise hydrogen’s energy potential

Sydney, Australia | Posted on August 15th, 2012

Researchers from the Materials Energy Research Laboratory in nanoscale (MERLin) at UNSW have synthesised nanoparticles of a commonly overlooked chemical compound called sodium borohydride and encased these inside nickel shells.

Their unique "core-shell" nanostructure has demonstrated remarkable hydrogen storage properties, including the release of energy at much lower temperatures than previously observed.

"No one has ever tried to synthesise these particles at the nanoscale because they thought it was too difficult, and couldn't be done. We're the first to do so, and demonstrate that energy in the form of hydrogen can be stored with sodium borohydride at practical temperatures and pressures," says Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou from the School of Chemical Engineering at UNSW.

Considered a major a fuel of the future, hydrogen could be used to power buildings, portable electronics and vehicles - but this application hinges on practical storage technology.

Lightweight compounds known as borohydrides (including lithium and sodium compounds) are known to be effective storage materials but it was believed that once the energy was released it could not be reabsorbed - a critical limitation. This perceived "irreversibility" means there has been little focus on sodium borohydride.

However, the result, published last week in the journal ACS Nano, demonstrates for the first time that reversibility is indeed possible using a borohydride material by itself and could herald significant advances in the design of novel hydrogen storage materials.

"By controlling the size and architecture of these structures we can tune theirproperties and make them reversible - this means they can release and reabsorb hydrogen," says Aguey-Zinsou, lead author on the paper. "We now have a way to tap into all these borohydride materials, which are particularly exciting for application on vehicles because of their highhydrogen storage capacity."

The researchers observed remarkable improvements in the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of their material. This means the chemical reactions needed to absorb and release hydrogen occurred faster than previously studied materials, and at significantly reduced temperatures - making possible application far more practical.

In its bulk form, sodium borohydride requires temperatures above 550 degrees Celsius just to release hydrogen. Even on the nano-scale the improvements were minimal. However, with their core-shell nanostructure, the researchers saw initial energy release happening at just 50 °C, and significant release at 350 °C.

"The new materials that could be generated by this exciting strategy could provide practical solutions to meet many of the energy targets set by the US Department of Energy," says Aguey-Zinsou. "The key thing here is that we've opened the doorway."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Myles Gough

61-029-385-1933

Copyright © University of New South Wales

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

International research partnership tricks the light fantastic March 2nd, 2015

UC research partnership explores how to best harness solar power March 2nd, 2015

Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum: Aerogel catalyst shows promise for fuel cells March 2nd, 2015

Important step towards quantum computing: Metals at atomic scale March 2nd, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

New nanodevice defeats drug resistance: Tiny particles embedded in gel can turn off drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs March 2nd, 2015

Forbidden quantum leaps possible with high-res spectroscopy March 2nd, 2015

Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum: Aerogel catalyst shows promise for fuel cells March 2nd, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Discoveries

Colon + septic tank = unique, at times stinky, study: Researchers use lab-scale human colon and septic tank to study impact of copper nanoparticles on the environment March 2nd, 2015

New nanodevice defeats drug resistance: Tiny particles embedded in gel can turn off drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs March 2nd, 2015

Breakthrough in OLED technology March 2nd, 2015

Important step towards quantum computing: Metals at atomic scale March 2nd, 2015

Announcements

International research partnership tricks the light fantastic March 2nd, 2015

UC research partnership explores how to best harness solar power March 2nd, 2015

Researchers turn unzipped nanotubes into possible alternative for platinum: Aerogel catalyst shows promise for fuel cells March 2nd, 2015

Important step towards quantum computing: Metals at atomic scale March 2nd, 2015

Energy

UC research partnership explores how to best harness solar power March 2nd, 2015

In quest for better lithium-air batteries, chemists boost carbon's stability: Nanoparticle coatings improve stability, cyclability of '3DOm' carbon February 25th, 2015

New nanowire structure absorbs light efficiently: Dual-type nanowire arrays can be used in applications such as LEDs and solar cells February 25th, 2015

Learning by eye: Silicon micro-funnels increase the efficiency of solar cells February 25th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE