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Home > Press > Production of Nanosensors with Effective Elimination Ability to Measure Aromatic Pollutants

Abstract:
Iranian researchers from the University of Mohaqqeq Ardebili and the University of Bath in Britain obtained the technology to produce a nanosensor in order to measure environmental pollutants that are called dihydroxybenzene.

Production of Nanosensors with Effective Elimination Ability to Measure Aromatic Pollutants

Tehran, Iran | Posted on August 14th, 2012

In addition to having reasonable price, the proposed electrode in the research is able to adsorb huge amounts of dihydroxybenzene impurities. Such pollutants are widely used in cosmetics, pesticides, odor and flavor essences, drugs, antioxidants, and chemical compounds in photography and paints

The scientists made the progress by carrying out voltammetric studies on dihydroxybenzene on the surface of a glass carbon electrode modified with composite film of carbon-chitosan nanoparticles with high area.

"Carbonic materials are important in electro-analysis. Various types of carbonic materials such as sheet graphite, glass carbon, carbon nanotubes, boron-doped diamond, and carbon nanoparticles improve the properties of electrodes in a wide range of applications. Therefore, we firstly produced and characterized carbon nanotube/chitosan nanocomposite. Then, we studied the electrochemical properties of the obtained electrode in the presence of dihydroxybenzene after the preparation of the electrode by casting on the surface of the electrode. Next, we developed the research and measured very low concentrations of the mentioned compounds by using adsorption studies," Dr. Mandana Amiri, member of the Scientific Board of University of Mohaqqeq Ardebili, said about the research.

In this research, the real samples of water like a local river water and wastewater from a rubber factory were tested by the electrode, and the results were analyzed. The results showed a range of 96-108% recycling in various concentrations.

The results of the research have been published on 20 February 2012 in Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, vol. 162, issue 1, pp. 194-200.

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