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Home > Press > Cornell, Stanford Nanoscience Pioneers Join Journalists for Look Into the Future

Abstract:
WHAT: A panel of nanoscience pioneers from Cornell and Stanford universities will discuss cutting-edge applications of their science and the future of nanotechnology during a special interactive online media briefing.

WHEN: Friday, July 20, 2012, from 10 to 11 a.m.

WHERE: In person, the media briefing will take place in Room 226, Weill Hall, at Cornell's Ithaca campus. Online participants are invited to join the conversation via computer, tablet or smartphone through WebEx.

MEDIA: Media members are invited to take part, in person or online. To do so, please RSVP to John Carberry in Cornell's Press Relations Office at 607-255-5353 or

Cornell, Stanford Nanoscience Pioneers Join Journalists for Look Into the Future

Ithaca, NY | Posted on July 13th, 2012

Working at the atomic level - where the intuitive rules of physics bend and compounds take on new and marvelous properties - nanoscience researchers have spent more than three decades revolutionizing everything from photonics, electronics and polymers to the fabrics we wear for work and fashion.

But what's next?

On Friday, July 20, from 10 to 11 a.m., a special panel of nantechnology researchers will gather at Cornell University and explore the future of nanoscience during an interactive conversation with members of the media - both on site in Ithaca and online from anywhere in the world via WebEx technology.

Joining journalists for the discussion will be:

 Juan Hinestroza, an associate professor fiber science, directs the Textiles Nanotechnology Laboratory at Cornell's College of Human Ecology. His research on understanding fundamental phenomena at the nanoscale that are relevant to fiber and polymer science, has led to breakthrough "multifunctional fibers" that can hold or change color, conduct and sense micro-electrical currents, and selectively filter toxic gasses.

 Roger Howe, faculty director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility and director of the 14-institution, National Science Foundation-supported National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. Howe, a professor of electrical engineering at Stanford who has held faculty positions at Carnegie-Mellon, MIT and UC-Berkeley, has for more than two decades been among the world leaders in micro- and nano-electromechanical systems design.

 Michal Lipson, an associate Professor at Cornell's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, focuses her research on novel on-chip nanophotonics devices - in particular, light-confining structures that can slow down, enhance and manipulate light. A 2010 MacArthur Fellow, Lipson has pioneered several of the critical building blocks for silicon photonics including the GHz silicon modulators.

 Christopher Kemper Ober is a professor of materials engineering at Cornell. A fellow of the American Chemical Society, his research has advanced the ability of engineers to tailor the chemical structure of materials and "exquisitely control" material properties - especially the thermal, optical and electrical properties of polymers, the basis of the nanotechnology revolution.

This special media briefing wraps up two days of programming at Cornell to mark the 35th anniversary of the Cornell NanoScale Science and Technology Facility, a national user facility that supports a broad range of nanoscale science and technology projects by providing state-of-the-art resources coupled with expert staff support. With more than 700 users each year, research at CNF encompasses physical sciences, engineering and life sciences, and has a strong inter-disciplinary emphasis. The fabrication, synthesis, computation, characterization, and integration resources of CNF allow researchers to build structures, devices and systems from atomic to complex length-scales.

The CNF is supported by the National Science Foundation, the New York State Office of Science, Technology and Academic Research, Cornell University and the facility's users, and is a member of the NNIN.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
John Carberry
Phone: (607) 255-5353
Cell: (607) 227-0767

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Juan Hinestroza bio:

Roger Howe bio:

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