Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > UK scientists develop optimum piezoelectric energy harvesters: Research will lead to better more efficient harvesting devices

Abstract:
Scientists working as part of the Metrology for Energy Harvesting Project have developed a new model to deliver the maximum power output for piezoelectric energy harvesters.

UK scientists develop optimum piezoelectric energy harvesters: Research will lead to better more efficient harvesting devices

UK | Posted on March 2nd, 2012

Piezoelectric materials convert electrical energy into a strain (or vice-versa). The best known use of piezoelectricity is for medical ultrasound.

Piezoelectric energy harvesters utilise energy from unwanted mechanical vibrations, such as the rattling of an air conditioning duct or the movement of a bridge with passing traffic. Power levels are small, usually a few milli-watts or less, but the scavenged energy could be used to power autonomous devices such as wireless sensors.

Piezoelectric energy harvesters are typically vibrating cantilevers, covered with a piezoelectric layer that converts mechanical strain to an electrical charge to power devices. Most developers cover the entire length of the cantilever with piezoelectric material in an attempt to maximise the conversion efficiency.

However, scientists based at the UK's at National Physical Laboratory, one of seven national measurement institutes involved in the European Metrology Research Programme funded project have discovered that this approach is counterproductive. Their research shows that due to the charge redistribution across the cantilever there is an internal loss of power of up to 25% of potential output. To counter this the team has developed a model to show that more energy can be converted if the beam is only covered with piezoelectric for two thirds of its length.

Current piezoelectric energy harvesting devices are used in applications such as wireless and battery-less light switches, and sensors. However, their potential applications range from the predictive maintenance of any moving or rotating machine parts, to electronic devices that harvest their own wasted operational energy to be more energy efficient.

Harvesting energy that would otherwise be wasted is key to meeting future energy demands while reducing carbon emissions. This energy can come from light, heat, movement or vibrations.

Markys Cain, Knowledge Leader at NPL, said:

"The energy harvesting market was worth $605 million in 2010 but is predicted to reach $4.4 billion by the end of this decade. For the market to reach its true potential we need to develop the products that can guarantee a greater energy yield and drive industrial adoption of energy harvesting products. The work undertaken by the Functional Materials Group at NPL will do exactly that, providing a model for more efficient piezoelectric energy harvesting methods."

The research was originally published in Applied Physics Letters 100, 073901 (2012).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Joe Meaney

44-787-546-9309

Copyright © National Physical Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Physics

Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer: Atoms frozen to absolute zero using microwaves July 2nd, 2015

Nanospiked bacteria are the brightest hard X-ray emitters July 2nd, 2015

News and information

Discovery of nanotubes offers new clues about cell-to-cell communication July 2nd, 2015

Nanospiked bacteria are the brightest hard X-ray emitters July 2nd, 2015

Engineering the world’s smallest nanocrystal July 2nd, 2015

Sensors

New micro-supercapacitor structure inspired by the intricate design of leaves: A team of scientists in Korea has devised a new method for making a graphene film for supercapacitors July 2nd, 2015

Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels: Methods will allow researchers to develop new 'smart' materials June 30th, 2015

Visible Light-Sensitive Photocatalysts Used for Purification of Contaminated Water in Iran June 30th, 2015

Graphene breakthrough as Bosch creates magnetic sensor 100 times more sensitive than silicon equivalent June 28th, 2015

Discoveries

The quantum middle man July 2nd, 2015

Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer: Atoms frozen to absolute zero using microwaves July 2nd, 2015

Producing spin-entangled electrons July 2nd, 2015

NIST Group Maps Distribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials July 2nd, 2015

Announcements

Nanospiked bacteria are the brightest hard X-ray emitters July 2nd, 2015

Engineering the world’s smallest nanocrystal July 2nd, 2015

Producing spin-entangled electrons July 2nd, 2015

NIST Group Maps Distribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials July 2nd, 2015

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

New micro-supercapacitor structure inspired by the intricate design of leaves: A team of scientists in Korea has devised a new method for making a graphene film for supercapacitors July 2nd, 2015

Samsung's New Graphene Technology Will Double Life Of Your Lithium-Ion Battery July 1st, 2015

June 29th, 2015

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project