Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Perfectly spherical gold nanodroplets produced with the smallest-ever nanojets

Similar to the way water backjets eject droplets of water on the surface of a pond, powerful laser pulses can locally melt gold nanostructures and produce gold nanojets, ejecting perfectly spherical gold nanodroplets.
Similar to the way water backjets eject droplets of water on the surface of a pond, powerful laser pulses can locally melt gold nanostructures and produce gold nanojets, ejecting perfectly spherical gold nanodroplets.

Abstract:
KU Leuven researcher Ventsislav Valev and an international team of scientists have developed a new method for optical manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. Using ‘plasmonic hotspots' - regions with electric current that heat up very locally - gold nanostructures can be melted and made to produce the smallest nanojets ever observed. The tiny gold nanodroplets formed in the nanojets, are perfectly spherical, which makes them interesting for applications in medicine.

Perfectly spherical gold nanodroplets produced with the smallest-ever nanojets

Leuven, Belgium | Posted on January 14th, 2012

The ‘backjet' phenomenon on which the method turns can be compared to a pebble being dropped into water. Tightly focused ultrafast laser pulses carry sufficient energy to locally melt the surface of a gold film. When a laser pulse of light hits the film, a nanoscale backjet - a nanojet - of molten gold surges upward.

As the name suggests, nanojets on the surface of a homogeneous gold film are incredibly small, their size being determined by the distribution of energy in the light pulse. This distribution of energy is in turn dependent on the wavelength of light. Initially, scientists anticipated that nanojets could not be significantly smaller than the wavelength of light. In this study however, Ventsislav Valev and his colleagues show that nanojets can in fact be made much smaller with the help of ‘plasmonic hotspots'.

Plasmonic hotspots are regions on the surface of metal nanostructures where light causes very strong oscillation of the electrons. Because electron oscillations constitute an electric current and because electric currents heat up the material the same way an electric stove heats up in the kitchen, the plasmonic hotspots are extremely hot. So hot that they can melt the gold in a spot much smaller than the wavelength of light. Dr. Valev and his colleagues were successfully able to demonstrate that this tiny little pool of molten gold can give rise to the smallest nanojets ever observed.

The gold nanodroplets propelled upward by the nanojets solidify in flight, producing perfectly spherical nanoparticles. These gold nanodroplets can be collected and used for medical applications including cancer treatment. The nanoparticles can be attached to molecules and injected in the blood. Once the molecules attach to cancer cells, light can be used to heat up the gold nanodroplets and destroy the cancer cells. Currently, the gold nanoparticles used in medications are chemically synthesised. These chemically synthesised gold nanoparticles have an unavoidably granular aspect. Conversely, gold nanodroplets created by the plasmonic nanojet method detailed by Dr. Valev and his colleagues are perfectly spherical, ensuring a better efficiency.

The study was conducted in collaboration with scientists from Germany, the United Kingdom, Bulgaria, Russia and Singapore and is published in the latest edition of the journal Advanced Materials.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dr. Ventsislav Valev
Molecular Imaging and Photonics
Faculty of Science
University of Leuven


Griet Van der Perre
+32 16 32 40 08

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Full bibliographic informationVentsislav K. Valev, Denitza Denkova, Xuezhi Zheng, Arseniy I. Kuznetsov, Carsten Reinhardt, Boris N. Chichkov, Gichka Tsutsumanova, Edward J. Osley, Veselin Petkov, Ben De Clercq, Alejandro V. Silhanek, Yogesh Jeyaram, Vladimir Volskiy, Paul A. Warburton, Guy A. E. Vandenbosch, Stoyan Russev, Oleg A. Aktsipetrov, Marcel Ameloot, Victor V. Moshchalkov, Thierry Verbiest, Plasmon-Enhanced Sub-Wavelength Laser Ablation: Plasmonic Nanojets, Advanced Materials, Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012, DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103807:

Related News Press

News and information

Halas wins American Physical Society's Lilienfeld Prize: Rice University nanoscientist honored for pioneering research in plasmonics October 23rd, 2017

GTC Shanghai Highlights GF’s Momentum in China: Company shares details of technology roadmap and customer adoption in the world’s fastest-growing market for semiconductors October 23rd, 2017

Nanobiotix completes patient inclusion for Phase II/III trial of NBTXR3 in soft tissue sarcoma October 23rd, 2017

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) October 23rd, 2017

Nanomedicine

Nanobiotix completes patient inclusion for Phase II/III trial of NBTXR3 in soft tissue sarcoma October 23rd, 2017

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) October 23rd, 2017

Arrowhead Presents Promising Preclinical Data on Development of ARO-AAT for Treatment of Alpha-1 Liver Disease at Liver Meeting(R) 2017 October 23rd, 2017

Spinning strands hint at folding dynamics: Rice University lab uses magnetic beads to model microscopic proteins, polymers October 17th, 2017

Discoveries

Researchers bring optical communication onto silicon chips: Ultrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers October 23rd, 2017

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper: Rice University researchers show their flexible fibers work well but weigh much less October 23rd, 2017

A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Swansea University’s physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol October 22nd, 2017

Creation of coherent states in molecules by incoherent electrons October 21st, 2017

Announcements

Nanobiotix completes patient inclusion for Phase II/III trial of NBTXR3 in soft tissue sarcoma October 23rd, 2017

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) October 23rd, 2017

Researchers bring optical communication onto silicon chips: Ultrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers October 23rd, 2017

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper: Rice University researchers show their flexible fibers work well but weigh much less October 23rd, 2017

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Researchers bring optical communication onto silicon chips: Ultrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers October 23rd, 2017

A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Swansea University’s physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol October 22nd, 2017

Creation of coherent states in molecules by incoherent electrons October 21st, 2017

Novel 'converter' heralds breakthrough in ultra-fast data processing at nanoscale: Invention bagged four patents and could potentially make microprocessor chips work 1,000 times faster October 20th, 2017

Research partnerships

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper: Rice University researchers show their flexible fibers work well but weigh much less October 23rd, 2017

Novel 'converter' heralds breakthrough in ultra-fast data processing at nanoscale: Invention bagged four patents and could potentially make microprocessor chips work 1,000 times faster October 20th, 2017

Strange but true: turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer October 20th, 2017

Leti Coordinating Project to Develop Innovative Drivetrains for 3rd-generation Electric Vehicles: CEA Tech’s Contribution Includes Liten’s Knowhow in Magnetic Materials and Simulation And Leti’s Expertise in Wide-bandgap Semiconductors October 20th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project