Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Nanomechanics as a Corner Stone of Nanotechnology

Abstract:
The new still emerging field of nanomechanics is, probably, one of the simplest parts in the conceptual foundation of nanoscale sciences and
nanotechnology.
A first nationally distributed short course "Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes" has been presented at the Annual ASME Congress in 2001 by Dr. Vasyl Michael Harik, then a Senior Staff Scientist at the ICASE Institute at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. In 2011, exactly ten years after the first presentation of that short course, a new book with the same title "Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes"
jhu.md/tWET33 has been published by a 2004 NASA spin-off, Nanodesigns Consulting of Newark, DE.

Nanomechanics as a Corner Stone of Nanotechnology

Newark, DE | Posted on January 10th, 2012

Since Galileo Galilei in the 17-th century, mechanics has become the basis of modern physical sciences. A statement that a science only then becomes a science, when it starts using mathematics belongs to Galileo, who advocated a rigor and specificity in the description, if not the analysis, of scientific experiments. After the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 and 1993 by Iijima and his lab, the analysis of mechanical behavior of the multi wall and the single wall carbon nanotubes has laid the new foundation for the precise description of various nanoscale experiments and the nanoscale analysis of new materials, nanostructures and nanoparticles of only 1 nm in diameter, for example, the so called Buckminster ball or the "bucky" ball, i.e., the spherical C60 carbon particles. It so happens that the "bucky" ball is the smallest material particle that satisfies a rigorous nanoscale (homogenization) criterion for the averaging of material properties [1].

In 2001, a classification of carbon nanotubes have been done according to their sizes: diameters, length, their aspect ratio and other key ratios [1].

The aspect ratio of carbon nanotubes is the key parameter in the design of new atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. It is widely known that carbon nanotubes are the strongest material, yet they may fall apart when their radius is about one carbon ring in size. These structurally unstable nanotubes belong to the class of carbon nanocrystals, in addition to other three classes of carbon nanotubes (i.e., the thin and thick nanotube shells and the long or the high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes [1]).

A first nationally distributed short course "Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes" has been presented at the Annual ASME Congress in 2001 by Dr. Vasyl Michael Harik, then a Senior Staff Scientist at the ICASE Institute at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. In 2011, exactly ten years after the first presentation of that short course, a new book with the same title has been published by a 2004 NASA spin-off, Nanodesigns Consulting of Newark, DE. The new still emerging field of nanomechanics is, probably, one of the simplest parts in the conceptual foundation of new nanoscale sciences and the nanotechnology. It is an essential part of the new nanotech education.

[1] V. M. Harik, Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes, 2011. Nanodesigns Press, Nanodesigns Consulting (P.O. Box 9090, Newark, DE 19714-9090) Newark, Delaware.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dr. Vasyl Michael Harik

Copyright © Nanodesigns Consulting

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors January 20th, 2018

New Method Uses DNA, Nanoparticles and Top-Down Lithography to Make Optically Active Structures: Technique could lead to new classes of materials that can bend light, such as for those used in cloaking devices January 18th, 2018

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Announces Pricing of Underwritten Public Offering of Common Stock January 18th, 2018

Leti to Demo New Curving Technology at Photonics West that Improves Performance of Optical Components January 18th, 2018

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Nanotube fibers in a jiffy: Rice University lab makes short nanotube samples by hand to dramatically cut production time January 11th, 2018

Touchy nanotubes work better when clean: Rice, Swansea scientists show that decontaminating nanotubes can simplify nanoscale devices January 4th, 2018

Paving the way for a non-electric battery to store solar energy: UMass Amherst scientists say a polymer chain organized like a string of Christmas lights assists energy storage December 22nd, 2017

Nanotubes go with the flow to penetrate brain tissue: Rice University scientists, engineers develop microfluidic devices, microelectrodes for gentle implantation December 19th, 2017

Announcements

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors January 20th, 2018

New Method Uses DNA, Nanoparticles and Top-Down Lithography to Make Optically Active Structures: Technique could lead to new classes of materials that can bend light, such as for those used in cloaking devices January 18th, 2018

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Announces Pricing of Underwritten Public Offering of Common Stock January 18th, 2018

Leti to Demo New Curving Technology at Photonics West that Improves Performance of Optical Components January 18th, 2018

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors January 20th, 2018

Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquaculture Surfaces inspired by carnivorous plants delay degradation by marine fouling January 17th, 2018

Ultrathin black phosphorus for solar-driven hydrogen economy: Osaka University researchers use sunlight to make hydrogen with a new nanostructured catalyst based on nanosheets of black phosphorus and bismuth vanadate January 17th, 2018

Ultra-thin optical fibers offer new way to 3-D print microstructures: Novel approach lays groundwork for using 3-D printing to repair tissue in the body January 17th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project