Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Trojan Horse Causes Nanoparticle Allergy

Abstract:
Workers with existing allergic conditions have worse reactions when exposed to nanoparticles in the workplace, suggest Chinese scientists. They believe that the response is caused by a Trojan horse known as an exosome, which is present in all of us.

Trojan Horse Causes Nanoparticle Allergy

Germany | Posted on December 18th, 2011

Nanoparticles are becoming ubiquitous in industry and commercial applications, and there are rightly concerns about their safety, which is often still not as well understood as their physical properties. In particular, it is important for employers to understand the effects of nanoparticles on the immune system and allergic reactions to them in order to safeguard their workers against long-term and short-term effects of exposure.

Now, a team of scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, led by Guangjun Nie and Yuliang Zhao, has studied these effects using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. They propose that, when inhaled, the nanoparticles induce formation of a vesiclelike intra- and intercellular vehicle called an exosome in the lungs. Inhalation is the most common way for nanoparticles to be introduced to the human body. Exosomes are known to act as Trojan horses to deliver sometimes unwanted particles such as viruses into cells, and in this case they quickly remove the nanoparticles from the lungs and convey signals throughout the body, including to the immune system. In those individuals that already have some kind of allergic respiratory condition (known as sensitized individuals), these signals can result in both direct and indirect activation of T cells, which cause familiar allergic responses such as inflammation. In unsensitized individuals the body's response is much lower, as the pathway to T-cell activation only takes the indirect pathway.

The scientists believe that their work should urgently inform policy guidelines and further research to protect both sensitized and unsensitized workers from allergic reactions caused by occupational exposure to nanoparticles.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

M. Zhu et al., Small ; DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101708

Related News Press

News and information

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

JPK reports on the use of AFM and the CellHesion module to study plant cells at the University of Queensland November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Discoveries

Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Blu-ray disc can be used to improve solar cell performance: Data storage pattern transferred to solar cell increases light absorption November 25th, 2014

Announcements

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

JPK reports on the use of AFM and the CellHesion module to study plant cells at the University of Queensland November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Sustainable Nanotechnologies Project November 20th, 2014

A gut reaction November 19th, 2014

Nanosafety research – there’s room for improvement October 29th, 2014

Plastic nanoparticles also harm freshwater organisms October 18th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More












ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE