Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > 2011 Steacie Prize awarded for nanotechnology-enabled disease diagnosis: Pharmacy's Shana Kelley third consecutive U of T professor to win prestigious science and engineering award

Pharmacy professor Shana Kelley's creative nanotechnology research has earned her the 2011 Steacie Prize. (Pharmacy photo)
Pharmacy professor Shana Kelley's creative nanotechnology research has earned her the 2011 Steacie Prize.

(Pharmacy photo)

Abstract:
Professor Shana Kelley of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy is the winner of the 2011 Steacie Prize, marking the third consecutive year that a University of Toronto professor has received this prestigious award.

2011 Steacie Prize awarded for nanotechnology-enabled disease diagnosis: Pharmacy's Shana Kelley third consecutive U of T professor to win prestigious science and engineering award

Toronto, Canada | Posted on December 16th, 2011

"It's wonderful and at the same time humbling to get this type of recognition - which is really recognition of the talents of all of the past and present members of my research group," said Kelley, who is also a professor in the Department of Biochemistry in the Faculty of Medicine and cross-appointed to the Department of Chemistry and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering.

Kelley's research centres on the development of nanomaterial-based detection systems that can track miniscule quantities of biomolecular analytes [components]. The highly sensitive DNA and RNA detection systems developed by Kelley are powerful new tools for cancer and infectious disease identification, and represent a major advance over the current time consuming and painful methods.

Using small, non-invasive samples, Kelley's diagnostic tool is able to identify minute levels of the biomarkers of disease. This technology is able to provide disease diagnosis at a fraction of the costs and in a fraction of the time of current methods, and is able to do so ten times earlier than current practices allow.

"I can think of no other more deserving candidate than Dr. Kelley to receive the Steacie Prize," said Professor Henry Mann, dean of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy. "She is a highly creative and interdisciplinary scientist who unites materials chemistry, analytical chemistry and molecular biology to sense biological molecules with unprecedented sensitivity. Her proven track record of executing innovative and groundbreaking research certainly aligns her work with the goals of the prestigious Steacie Prize."

The Steacie Prize recognizes outstanding Canadian research in science and engineering. Winners are selected by a panel appointed by the E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fund, a private fund dedicated to advancing science and engineering in Canada.

"Professor Kelley's research has always been on the cutting edge of nanotechnology," noted Professor Paul Young, vice-president (research). "Her work developing fast, low-cost methods for disease detection and diagnosis will save lives across the world. We've always been proud to have Professor Kelley as a faculty member at the University of Toronto and on behalf of the institution, I extend my congratulations to her on winning the Steacie Prize. It is richly deserved."

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Toronto

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition: Nagoya University-led team of physicists use a synchrotron radiation X-ray source to probe a so-called 'structure-less' transition and develop a new understanding of molecular conductors August 21st, 2017

Tokai University research: Nanomaterial wrap for improved tissue imaging August 21st, 2017

Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors August 20th, 2017

The power of perovskite: OIST researchers improve perovskite-based technology in the entire energy cycle, from solar cells harnessing power to LED diodes to light the screens of future electronic devices and other lighting applications August 18th, 2017

Nanomedicine

Tokai University research: Nanomaterial wrap for improved tissue imaging August 21st, 2017

Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancer: New treatment cures, vaccinates mouse in small proof-of-concept study August 18th, 2017

Freeze-dried foam soaks up carbon dioxide: Rice University scientists lead effort to make novel 3-D material August 16th, 2017

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors: Researchers discover that fluorescence in ligand-protected gold nanoclusters is an intrinsic property of the gold particles themselves August 16th, 2017

Announcements

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition: Nagoya University-led team of physicists use a synchrotron radiation X-ray source to probe a so-called 'structure-less' transition and develop a new understanding of molecular conductors August 21st, 2017

Tokai University research: Nanomaterial wrap for improved tissue imaging August 21st, 2017

Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors August 20th, 2017

The power of perovskite: OIST researchers improve perovskite-based technology in the entire energy cycle, from solar cells harnessing power to LED diodes to light the screens of future electronic devices and other lighting applications August 18th, 2017

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Two Scientists Receive Grants to Develop New Materials: Chad Mirkin and Monica Olvera de la Cruz recognized by Sherman Fairchild Foundation August 16th, 2017

2-faced 2-D material is a first at Rice: Rice University materials scientists create flat sandwich of sulfur, molybdenum and selenium August 14th, 2017

Moving at the Speed of Light: University of Arizona selected for high-impact, industrial demonstration of new integrated photonic cryogenic datalink for focal plane arrays: Program is major milestone for AIM Photonics August 10th, 2017

Landscapes give latitude to 2-D material designers: Rice University, Oak Ridge scientists show growing atom-thin sheets on cones allows control of defects August 9th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project