Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New hybrid technology could bring 'quantum information systems'

Structures called "metamaterials" and the merging of two technologies under development are promising the emergence of new "quantum information systems" far more powerful than today's computers. The concept hinges on using single photons – the tiny particles that make up light – for switching and routing in future computers that might harness the exotic principles of quantum mechanics. The image at left depicts a "spherical dispersion" of light in a conventional material, and the image at right shows the design of a metamaterial that has a "hyperbolic dispersion" not found in any conventional material, potentially producing quantum-optical applications. (Zubin Jacob)
Structures called "metamaterials" and the merging of two technologies under development are promising the emergence of new "quantum information systems" far more powerful than today's computers. The concept hinges on using single photons – the tiny particles that make up light – for switching and routing in future computers that might harness the exotic principles of quantum mechanics. The image at left depicts a "spherical dispersion" of light in a conventional material, and the image at right shows the design of a metamaterial that has a "hyperbolic dispersion" not found in any conventional material, potentially producing quantum-optical applications.

(Zubin Jacob)

Abstract:
The merging of two technologies under development - plasmonics and nanophotonics - is promising the emergence of new "quantum information systems" far more powerful than today's computers.

New hybrid technology could bring 'quantum information systems'

West Lafayette, IN | Posted on October 27th, 2011

The technology hinges on using single photons - the tiny particles that make up light - for switching and routing in future computers that might harness the exotic principles of quantum mechanics.

The quantum information processing technology would use structures called "metamaterials," artificial nanostructured media with exotic properties.

The metamaterials, when combined with tiny "optical emitters," could make possible a new hybrid technology that uses "quantum light" in future computers, said Vladimir Shalaev, scientific director of nanophotonics at Purdue University's Birck Nanotechnology Center and a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering.

The concept is described in an article to be published Friday (Oct. 28) in the journal Science. The article will appear in the magazine's Perspectives section and was written by Shalaev and Zubin Jacob, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Alberta, Canada.

"A seamless interface between plasmonics and nanophotonics could guarantee the use of light to overcome limitations in the operational speed of conventional integrated circuits," Shalaev said.

Researchers are proposing the use of "plasmon-mediated interactions," or devices that manipulate individual photons and quasiparticles called plasmons that combine electrons and photons.

One of the approaches, pioneered at Harvard University, is a tiny nanowire that couples individual photons and plasmons. Another approach is to use hyperbolic metamaterials, suggested by Jacob; Igor Smolyaninov, a visiting research scientist at the University of Maryland; and Evgenii Narimanov, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue. Quantum-device applications using building blocks for such hyperbolic metamaterials have been demonstrated in Shalaev's group.

"We would like to record and read information with single photons, but we need a very efficient source of single photons," Shalaev said. "The challenge here is to increase the efficiency of generation of single photons in a broad spectrum, and that is where plasmonics and metamaterials come in."

Today's computers work by representing information as a series of ones and zeros, or binary digits called "bits."

Computers based on quantum physics would have quantum bits, or "qubits," that exist in both the on and off states simultaneously, dramatically increasing the computer's power and memory. Quantum computers would take advantage of a strange phenomenon described by quantum theory called "entanglement." Instead of only the states of one and zero, there are many possible "entangled quantum states" in between one and zero.

An obstacle in developing quantum information systems is finding a way to preserve the quantum information long enough to read and record it. One possible solution might be to use diamond with "nitrogen vacancies," defects that often occur naturally in the crystal lattice of diamonds but can also be produced by exposure to high-energy particles and heat.

"The nitrogen vacancy in diamond operates in a very broad spectral range and at room temperature, which is very important," Shalaev said.

The work is part of a new research field, called diamond photonics. Hyperbolic metamaterials integrated with nitrogen vacancies in diamond are expected to work as efficient "guns" of single photons generated in a broad spectral range, which could bring quantum information systems, he said.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Writer:
Emil Venere
765-494-4709


Sources:
Vladimir Shalaev
765-494-9855


Zubin Jacob

Copyright © Purdue University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) December 18th, 2018

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion December 17th, 2018

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Birth of a hybrid: High-temperature synthesis under pressure helps to combine properties of metals and ceramics December 15th, 2018

Physics

A new 'spin' on kagome lattices: Team's findings shed new light on the presence of spin-orbit coupling and topological spin textures in kagome lattices December 9th, 2018

Three CEA Projects Awarded European Research Council Synergy Grants November 26th, 2018

Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: ‘electron quantum metamaterials:’ UC Riverside’s Nathaniel Gabor and colleague formulate a vision for the field in a perspective article November 5th, 2018

2-D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research: Scientists say the tiny 'spins' of electrons show potential to one day support next-generation innovations in many fields October 31st, 2018

Quantum Computing

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion December 17th, 2018

Oxford Instruments participates in the launch of the European Quantum Technology Flagship Programme ‘QMiCS’ December 13th, 2018

Harnessing the power of 'spin orbit' coupling in silicon: Scaling up quantum computation December 7th, 2018

CEA-Leti Extends 300mm Line and Adds Avenues for Developing Disruptive Technologies: Execution Relies on CEA-Leti’s Fully Implemented Technology With Module-Level Innovations & Devices and Their Architectures December 3rd, 2018

Discoveries

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion December 17th, 2018

Birth of a hybrid: High-temperature synthesis under pressure helps to combine properties of metals and ceramics December 15th, 2018

Researchers use jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalyst: The inexpensive new material can split water just as efficiently as costly platinum December 14th, 2018

IMDEA Nanociencia and Universidad Autónoma de Madrid researchers have demonstrated that graphene deposited on a metal surface promotes an unusual chemical reaction that would hardly take place under noncatalyzed conditions. December 14th, 2018

Announcements

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Reports Inducement Grants under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4) December 18th, 2018

Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers: A quantum algorithm capable of performing quantum circuits parallelism and full configuration interactions calculations in any open shell molecules without exponential/combinatorial explosion December 17th, 2018

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Birth of a hybrid: High-temperature synthesis under pressure helps to combine properties of metals and ceramics December 15th, 2018

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Nanoscribe Presents Successor Model Photonic Professional GT2 for High-Resolution 3D Microfabrication: The first ever production of structures in millimeter size with micrometer precision December 4th, 2018

CEA-Leti Extends 300mm Line and Adds Avenues for Developing Disruptive Technologies: Execution Relies on CEA-Leti’s Fully Implemented Technology With Module-Level Innovations & Devices and Their Architectures December 3rd, 2018

Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses: New photonic crystal waveguide based on topological insulators paves the way to build futuristic light-based computers November 19th, 2018

GaN Rising: UC Santa Barbara electrical and computer engineering professor Umesh Mishra to deliver 63rd Annual Faculty Research Lecture November 16th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project