Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > No Batteries Required: Automobile Instruments Harvest Energy from Road Vibration to Keep Sensors Running

Provided/MicroGen Systems
Prototype chip from MicroGen Systems includes four piezoelectric power sources. The devices can shrink further as circuits require less power.
Provided/MicroGen Systems
Prototype chip from MicroGen Systems includes four piezoelectric power sources. The devices can shrink further as circuits require less power.

Abstract:
Your little deuce coupe, hot rod Lincoln or pink Cadillac gets a small boost of energy, as tiny sensors in your automobile can now harvest constant power from road vibration instead of replacing batteries.

No Batteries Required: Automobile Instruments Harvest Energy from Road Vibration to Keep Sensors Running

Ithaca, NY | Posted on August 10th, 2011

MicroGen Systems Inc., of Ithaca, and Cornell University's Cornell Nanoscale Facility, have collaborated to develop battery-free sensors that can operate in anything that spins, rolls, jiggles or shakes, like car tires and clothing dryers.

The battery device is a tiny sheet of a piezoelectric material that generates electricity when mounted on a shock-resistant base and it is flexed. Vibration like a spinning automobile wheel causes the tiny flap to swing back and forth, generating current that charges an adjacent thin-film battery. The prototype - about the size of a quarter - puts out up to 200 microwatts. As circuits become smaller and need less power, the device can shrink with them.

Several companies have already expressed interest in MicroGen's energy harvester technology.

Robert Andosca, president of MicroGen was first drawn to New York by research funding made available by Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.). Paul Mutolo, director of external partnerships for the university's Energy Materials Center (emc2), helped bring MicroGen to Ithaca, to be close to Cornell.

To refine the technology, Andosca needed the state-of-the-art facilities at the Cornell Nanoscale Facility. "There are 17 of these facilities in the country and Cornell's facility is one of the two best," says Andosca. Through the Energy Materials Center, MicroGen obtained startup funding from the New York State Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR) to support his work at the Cornell Nanoscale Facility. The funding comes from emc2's part in the NYS Center for Future Energy Systems and is targeted to assisting companies in the energy sector. The funding enabled him to build, test and redesign until he had a product that would meet the industry standard power level for wireless sensor units.

Now MicroGen is working with R. Bruce van Dover, professor of materials science and engineering, to refine the technology, particularly to develop a version that can withstand high temperatures, aiming for sensors in jet engines.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Blaine Friedlander

(607) 254-8093

Copyright © Newswise

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip: Device could improve wireless communications systems November 28th, 2014

Study details laser pulse effects on behavior of electrons November 28th, 2014

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals November 28th, 2014

Production of Anticancer Drug from Nanofibers in Iran November 28th, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip: Device could improve wireless communications systems November 28th, 2014

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals November 28th, 2014

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Sensors

Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals November 25th, 2014

Cooling with the coldest matter in the world November 24th, 2014

Canatu Launches CNB In-Mold Film for Transparent Touch on 3D Surfaces –in Cars, Household Appliances, Wearables, Portables November 20th, 2014

UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials: University of Oregon microscope puts spotlight on the surface structure of quantum dots for designing new solar devices November 20th, 2014

Announcements

University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip: Device could improve wireless communications systems November 28th, 2014

Study details laser pulse effects on behavior of electrons November 28th, 2014

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals November 28th, 2014

Production of Anticancer Drug from Nanofibers in Iran November 28th, 2014

Automotive/Transportation

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals November 28th, 2014

Purdue 3-D printing innovation capable of making stronger, lighter metal works for auto, aerospace industries November 20th, 2014

OCSiAl Builds Worldwide Partnership Network November 12th, 2014

NEI Development Update on NANOMYTE® TC-5001, a Protective Coating for Zinc-Plated and Galvanized Steel November 8th, 2014

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

OCSiAl Builds Worldwide Partnership Network November 12th, 2014

Drexel Engineers Improve Strength, Flexibility of Atom-Thick Films November 11th, 2014

A billion holes can make a battery November 10th, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More












ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE