Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Novel Cancer-Targeting Investigational Nanoparticle Receives FDA IND Approval for First-in-Human Trial

C dots fluoresce brightly enough to be seen through the skin of a mouse (faintly visible in this photo). Dots coated with polyethylene glycol have all reached the bladder in 45 minutes, demonstrating that C dots will be harmlessly excreted after they do their job. Credit Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
C dots fluoresce brightly enough to be seen through the skin of a mouse (faintly visible in this photo). Dots coated with polyethylene glycol have all reached the bladder in 45 minutes, demonstrating that C dots will be harmlessly excreted after they do their job. Credit Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Abstract:
Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's Nanotechnology Center, along with collaborators at Cornell University and Hybrid Silica Technologies, have received approval for their first Investigational New Drug Application (IND) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for an ultrasmall silica inorganic nanoparticle platform for targeted molecular imaging of cancer, which may be useful for cancer treatment in the future.

Novel Cancer-Targeting Investigational Nanoparticle Receives FDA IND Approval for First-in-Human Trial

New York, NY | Posted on January 31st, 2011

Center researchers are about to launch their first-in-human clinical trial in melanoma patients using this first-of-its-kind inorganic nanoparticle to be approved as a drug. "This is a very exciting and important first step for this new particle technology that we hope will ultimately lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes and prognoses for a number of different cancers," said Michelle Bradbury, MD, PhD, a clinician-scientist on Memorial Sloan-Kettering's Neuroradiology Service and an assistant professor of radiology at Weill Cornell Medical College, who is the lead investigator of the study, along with Snehal Patel, MD, a surgeon on Memorial Sloan-Kettering's Head and Neck Service, who is a co-principal investigator.

Cornell dots, or C dots, were initially developed as optical probes at Cornell University, Ithaca, by Ulrich Wiesner, PhD, a professor of materials science and engineering who, along with Hybrid Silica Technologies, Inc., the supplier of C dots, has spent the past eight years precisely engineering these particles. C dots were subsequently modified at Memorial Sloan-Kettering for use in PET imaging. C dots are tiny silica spheres that contain dye that glows three times more brightly than simple free dyes when excited by light of a specific wavelength. C dots can "light up" cancer cells, and act as tumor tracers for tracking the movement of cells and assisting in the optical diagnosis of tumors near the skin surface. The attachment of a radioactive label produces a new generation of multimodal (PET-optical) particle probes that additionally enable deeper detection, imaging, and monitoring of drug delivery using three-dimensional PET techniques.

C dots can be tailored to any particle size. Previous imaging experiments in mice conducted by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering team showed that particles of a very small size (in the 5 to 7 nanometer range) could be retained in the bloodstream and efficiently cleared through the kidneys after applying a neutral surface coat. More recently, the research team molecularly customized C dots to create a new particle platform, or probe, that can target surface receptors or other molecules expressed on tumor surfaces and that can be cleared through the kidneys. Using PET scans, C dots can be imaged to evaluate various biological properties of the tumors, including tumor accumulation, spread of metastatic disease, and treatment response to therapy.

The information gained from imaging tumors targeted with this multimodal platform may ultimately assist physicians in determining the extent of a tumor's spread, mapping lymph node disease, defining tumor borders for surgery, and improving real-time visualization of small vascular beds, anatomic channels, and neural structures during surgery.

The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the distribution, tissue, uptake, and safety of the particles in humans by PET imaging. This study will provide data that will serve as a baseline to guide the design of future surgical and oncologic applications in the clinic. "The use of PET imaging is an ideal imaging technology for sensitively monitoring very small doses of this new particle probe in first-in-human trials," added Steven Larson, MD, Chief of Memorial Sloan-Kettering's Nuclear Medicine Service.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering nanochemist Oula Penate Medina, PhD, notes that "this is an important trial in that it will help to answer a number of key questions regarding future potential applications of this multimodal system. Once the door has been opened, new and emerging fields, such as targeted drug delivery, can be investigated. We expect that these particles can be adapted for multiple clinical uses, including the early diagnosis and treatment of various cancers, as well as for sensing changes in the microenvironment."

"This clinical trial is the culmination of a longstanding collaborative effort with our colleagues at Cornell and Hybrid Silica Technologies, as well as a testament to our own institutional colleagues here at the Center," Dr. Bradbury said. "With the support of many, in particular the Office of Clinical Research, we've pushed to translate the C dots from a laboratory idea to our first FDA IND-approved inorganic nanomedicine drug product to be tested in the clinic," Dr. Bradbury said.

The work was funded in part by the Clinical and Translational Science Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, the Cornell Nanobiology Center, and the NIH Small-Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP). In addition to Drs. Bradbury, Penante-Medina, Larson, Patel, and Wiesner, the following Memorial Sloan-Kettering investigators contributed to and/or supported this work: Pat Zanzonico, PhD; Heiko Schöder, MD; Elisa De Stanchina, PhD; Hedvig Hricak, MD, Chair of the Department of Radiology; as well as Hooisweng Ow of Hybrid Silica Technologies, Inc.; Memorial Sloan-Kettering's Office of Clinical Research; and the Cyclotron Core.

####

About Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is the world’s oldest and largest private institution devoted to prevention, patient care, research, and education in cancer. Our scientists and clinicians generate innovative approaches to better understand, diagnose, and treat cancer. These specialists are leaders in biomedical research and in translating the latest research to advance the standard of cancer care worldwide.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jeanne D'Agostino

212-639-3573

Copyright © Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Warming up the world of superconductors: Clusters of aluminum metal atoms become superconductive at surprisingly high temperatures February 25th, 2015

SUNY Poly CNSE Researchers and Corporate Partners to Present Forty Papers at Globally Recognized Lithography Conference: SUNY Poly CNSE Research Group Awarded Both ‘Best Research Paper’ and ‘Best Research Poster’ at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2015 forum February 25th, 2015

European roadmap for graphene science and technology published February 25th, 2015

Possible Futures

European roadmap for graphene science and technology published February 25th, 2015

Quantum research past, present and future for discussion at AAAS February 16th, 2015

World’s first compact rotary 3D printer-cum-scanner unveiled at AAAS by NTU Singapore start-up: With production funded by crowdsourcing, the first unit will be delivered to the United States in March February 16th, 2015

Nanotechnology Electric Vehicle (EV) Market Analysis Report 2015: According to Radiant Insights, Inc February 13th, 2015

Academic/Education

NanoTecNexus Launches New App for Learning About Nanotechnology—STEM Education Project Spearheaded by Interns February 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly CNSE Researchers and Corporate Partners to Present Forty Papers at Globally Recognized Lithography Conference: SUNY Poly CNSE Research Group Awarded Both ‘Best Research Paper’ and ‘Best Research Poster’ at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2015 forum February 25th, 2015

KIT Increases Commitment in Asia: DAAD Funds Two New Projects: Strategic Partnerships with Chinese Universities and Communi-cation Technologies Network February 22nd, 2015

Minus K Technology Announces Its 2015 Vibration Isolator Educational Giveaway to U.S. Colleges and Universities February 18th, 2015

Nanomedicine

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

Announcements

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Quantum Dots/Rods

Optical nanoantennas set the stage for a NEMS lab-on-a-chip revolution February 24th, 2015

QD Vision Named Edison Award Finalist for Innovative Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Technology February 23rd, 2015

Ocean Optics Names Winner of 2015 Young Investigator Award: Cash prize and grant awarded during SPIE BiOS/Photonics West 2015 conference February 21st, 2015

Rediscovering spontaneous light emission: Berkeley researchers develop optical antenna for LEDs February 3rd, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Bacteria network for food: Bacteria connect to each other and exchange nutrients February 23rd, 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step: New, block-by-block assembly method could pave way for applications in opto-electronics, drug delivery February 23rd, 2015

Better batteries inspired by lowly snail shells: Biological molecules can latch onto nanoscale components and lock them into position to make high performing Li-ion battery electrodes, according to new research presented at the 59th annual meeting of the Biophysical Society February 12th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE