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Home > Press > Gold "Nano-Popcorn" Detects and Treats Tumors, Monitors Response to Therapy

"Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among the American male population, and the cost of treating prostate cancer patients is about $10 billion/year in the United States. Current treatments are mostly ineffective against advanced-stage prostate cancer and are often associated with severe side effects. Driven by these factors, we report a multifunctional, nanotechnology-driven, gold nano-popcorn-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay for targeted sensing, nanotherapy treatment, and in situ monitoring of photothermal nanotherapy response during the therapy process."  Credit J. Am. Chem. Soc.
"Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among the American male population, and the cost of treating prostate cancer patients is about $10 billion/year in the United States. Current treatments are mostly ineffective against advanced-stage prostate cancer and are often associated with severe side effects. Driven by these factors, we report a multifunctional, nanotechnology-driven, gold nano-popcorn-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay for targeted sensing, nanotherapy treatment, and in situ monitoring of photothermal nanotherapy response during the therapy process." Credit J. Am. Chem. Soc.

Abstract:
Using a two-step process that creates gold nanoparticles that look like kernels of popcorn, researchers at Jackson State University have created a targeted nanoparticle that can detect as few as 50 malignant prostate cells and serve as a thermal scalpel that can kill the cells. Moreover, the optical signal produced by these nanoparticles changes as cells die, providing a means of tracking the response of prostate tumor cells to thermal therapy.

Gold "Nano-Popcorn" Detects and Treats Tumors, Monitors Response to Therapy

Bethesda, MD | Posted on January 19th, 2011

Paresh Ray led the Jackson State team that conducted this study. The results of the team's work were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

As synthesized, the nanoparticles themselves would be toxic in the body, but the researchers took advantage of the toxic component to attach tumor targeting aptamers and monoclonal antibodies to the popcorn-shaped gold constructs. When irradiated with light, the nanoparticles emit light at a different frequency that can be detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, or SERS. The nanoparticles are such efficient SERS imaging agents that they produce a detectable optical signal after binding to clusters of a mere 50 cells thanks to the fact that the nanoparticles then aggregate into clusters that produce "hotspots" in a SERS image.

Once bound to prostate cancer cells, the gold nanoparticles can absorb light and convert it to heat, raising the local temperature to 48 C, which is sufficient to kill the tumor cells to which they are attached. During this experiment, the investigators noted that the SERS signal intensity decreased as the tumor cells died. Further study showed that there was a direct, linear correlation between the number of cells killed and the reduction in signal intensity, suggesting that this type of measurement could prove useful in assessing the therapeutic effect following photothermal therapy.

This work is detailed in a paper titled, "Gold Nano-Popcorn-Based Targeted Diagnosis, Nanotherapy Treatment, and in Situ Monitoring of Photothermal Therapy Response of Prostate Cancer Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy." An abstract of this paper is available at the journal's website.

View abstract pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja104924b

####

About NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer
To help meet the goal of reducing the burden of cancer, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is engaged in efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat and prevent cancer.

The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is a comprehensive, systematized initiative encompassing the public and private sectors, designed to accelerate the application of the best capabilities of nanotechnology to cancer.

Currently, scientists are limited in their ability to turn promising molecular discoveries into benefits for cancer patients. Nanotechnology can provide the technical power and tools that will enable those developing new diagnostics, therapeutics, and preventives to keep pace with today’s explosion in knowledge.

For more information, please click here

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