Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Tracking Therapeutic Nanoparticles that Target Breast Tumors

Credit Nano Letters
Credit Nano Letters

Abstract:
Researchers at Rice University, collaborating with investigators at the Baylor College of Medicine, have used two different types of imaging technologies to track the delivery of a therapeutic nanoparticle to breast tumors.

Tracking Therapeutic Nanoparticles that Target Breast Tumors

Bethesda, MD | Posted on December 17th, 2010

The results of this study, which appear in the journal Nano Letters, not only demonstrate the ability to create and track multimodal nanoparticles in the body, but also provide valuable information about how targeting agents impact the fate of complex nanoparticles in the body.

This work was led by Naomi Halas at Rice and Amit Joshi at Baylor. Dr. Halas is co-principal investigator of one of 12 Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnerships funded by the National Cancer Institute Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer. Dr. Joshi is a member of the Texas Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, one of nine Centers of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence funded by the National Cancer Institute Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

The investigators conducted their studies using a gold nanoshell to which they added a magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in a thin layer of silicon dioxide, followed by a layer of a fluorescent molecule known as ICG and targeting antibody, and finally a layer of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to render the entire construct biocompatible. For targeting breast tumors, the researchers used an antibody that recognizes the HER2 surface protein found on some forms of breast cancer.

After injecting this nanoparticle into mice bearing human tumors that overexpress the HER2 protein, the researchers used both near-infrared imaging and magnetic resonance imaging to follow the particles for the next 72 hours. Tumor levels of the nanoparticle peaked at about 4 hours after injection. In contrast, there was little nanoparticle accumulation in tumors when injected into mice bearing tumors that do not overexpress the HER2 protein. The results obtained when the animals were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging differed in that tumor levels did not peak until 24 hours after injection. The researchers hypothesized that the two results differed because fluorescence imaging detects nanoparticles attached to the outer edge of the tumor while magnetic resonance imaging detects nanoparticles distributed throughout the tumor mass. The fact that it takes longer for nanoparticles to diffuse into the core of a tumor than to merely bind to its surface would explain the time discrepancy. Additional experiments confirmed that the nanoparticles remained intact throughout the experiment.

This work, which was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute, is detailed in a paper titled "Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo." An abstract of this paper is available at the journal's website.

View abstract at pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl102889y

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Meteorite impact on a nano scale August 29th, 2016

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins August 29th, 2016

A nanoscale wireless communication system via plasmonic antennas: Greater control affords 'in-plane' transmission of waves at or near visible light August 27th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube: DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease August 25th, 2016

New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials August 25th, 2016

Johns Hopkins scientists track metabolic pathways to find drug combination for pancreatic cancer August 25th, 2016

New electrical energy storage material shows its power: Nanomaterial combines attributes of both batteries and supercapacitors August 25th, 2016

Possible Futures

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins August 29th, 2016

A nanoscale wireless communication system via plasmonic antennas: Greater control affords 'in-plane' transmission of waves at or near visible light August 27th, 2016

A promising route to the scalable production of highly crystalline graphene films August 26th, 2016

Academic/Education

AIM Photonics Announces Release of Process Design Kit (PDK) for Integrated Silicon Photonics Design August 25th, 2016

Nanotech Security Featured by Simon Fraser University: Company's Anti-Counterfeiting Technology Developed With the Help of University's 4D LABS Materials Research Institute August 21st, 2016

W.M. Keck Foundation awards Cal State LA a $375,000 research and education grant August 4th, 2016

Thomas Swan and NGI announce unique partnership July 28th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins August 29th, 2016

Nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in the behavior of stem and cancer cells August 25th, 2016

Johns Hopkins scientists track metabolic pathways to find drug combination for pancreatic cancer August 25th, 2016

50 years after the release of the film 'Fantastic Voyage,' science upstages fiction: Science upstages fiction with nanorobotic agents designed to travel in the human body to treat cancer August 25th, 2016

Announcements

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Meteorite impact on a nano scale August 29th, 2016

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins August 29th, 2016

A nanoscale wireless communication system via plasmonic antennas: Greater control affords 'in-plane' transmission of waves at or near visible light August 27th, 2016

Nanobiotechnology

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins August 29th, 2016

Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube: DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease August 25th, 2016

Nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in the behavior of stem and cancer cells August 25th, 2016

Johns Hopkins scientists track metabolic pathways to find drug combination for pancreatic cancer August 25th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic