Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Graphene rising

Graduate student Muge Acik - Courtesy of Rodolfo Guzman
Graduate student Muge Acik - Courtesy of Rodolfo Guzman

Abstract:
Grad student publishes on new material

By Rebecca Gomez

Graphene rising

Dallas, TX | Posted on November 1st, 2010

Before her research was published in the Oct. 2010 issue of the scientific journal Nature Materials, before her discovery of a radical new formation of graphene oxide, before she could even conceive of what the data from her experiments was telling her, materials science graduate student Muge Acik had to prove quantum physics wrong.

Acik, more familiar with chemistry than physics, worked with Materials Science Department Head Yves Chabal to observe the unusual behavior of electrons in the experiments.

"The exciting part was that to discover this conformation of graphene oxide, we had to solve how this conformation occurred," Chabal said.

The phenomena couldn't be explained by current physics. It was because of the unique properties of a new material called graphene.

According to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RASA), who awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics for the isolation and identification of graphene done by other physicists, graphene is a single layer of carbon just one atom thick. RASA has produced a public information document that states graphene is the strongest, thinnest material known on earth. Not only is it transparent, but it's also an ultra-fast conductor of electrons and heat.

Chabal was granted funding by Nanotech Research Initiative (NRI) and Texas Instruments (TI) to determine if graphene could be modified to supersede silicon-based transistors in creating faster, more powerful microelectronic devices.

"Transistors are very small switches that comprise the basic function of every electronic device. They give you a one or a zero, a yes or a no," Chabal said.

Chabal chose Acik, who had been endowed by a TI Diversity Fellowship, to create a stable attachment of graphene to oxygen that would render the material functional as a transistor.

"Imagine knowing only bicycles and being told to figure out how to use a car," Acik said. "That was graphene for me."

The research required completely new machines to experiment with the nano-scale material, machines that came with digital displays Acik said she was not familiar with. Acik enlisted the help of Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory (NSERL) lab assistant and computer engineering senior Rudolfo Guzman to understand the computer side of the experiments.

"At first their research was foreign to me, but I was able to help with any electrical system or computer programming issues in the lab," Guzman said.

The cross-disciplinary team collaborated with materials science professor Kyeongjae Cho and the entire faculty of NSERL to find out exactly what they had created.

"The formation we discovered was functional ether bound at the edges of graphene. This detail may seem mundane, but once discovered it can have great results," Chabal said.

The results as concluded in their Nature Materials article, ‘unusual infrared-absorption mechanism in thermally reduced graphene oxide,' stated this conformation of graphene oxide showed promise in applications of solar panels or thermal-infrared remote sensing (night vision).

Even though the research was driven by creating a graphene based transistor, Chabal said it is common that nanotechnology research will lead to unexpected applications.

He used similar research into microelectronic device applications for carbon nanotubules as an example.

"While people are waiting for the microelectronic devices, they may not know that tennis balls are already being manufactured with carbon nanotubules."

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Texas at Dallas

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

JPK reports on the use of AFM and the CellHesion module to study plant cells at the University of Queensland November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Physics

Cooling with the coldest matter in the world November 24th, 2014

Researchers discern the shapes of high-order Brownian motions November 17th, 2014

Heat Transfer Sets the Noise Floor for Ultrasensitive Electronics November 11th, 2014

Noise in a microwave amplifier is limited by quantum particles of heat November 10th, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals November 25th, 2014

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly Student Awarded Fellowship with the U.S. Department of Energy's Postgraduate Research Program: Ph.D. Candidate Accepts Postmaster's Appointment To Conduct Research At Albany NanoTech Complex November 13th, 2014

SUNY Polytechnic Institute Hosts Massive Crowd of More Than 3,000 People Who Attended Community Day Activities Across New York State: CNSE’s ‘NANOvember’ kickoff event highlights New York State’s growing high-tech sector with open house events in Albany, Utica, and Rochester November 3rd, 2014

SUNY Polytechnic Institute Invites the Public to Attend its Popular Statewide 'NANOvember' Series of Outreach and Educational Events October 23rd, 2014

First Canada Excellence Research Chair gets $10 million from the federal government for oilsands research at the University of Calgary: Federal government announces prestigious research chair to study improving oil production efficiency October 19th, 2014

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

Tesla NanoCoatings Increasing Use of SouthWest NanoTechnologies Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) for its Infrastructure Coatings and Paints: High Quality SMW™ Specialty Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes Incorporated into Teslan®-brand coatings used by Transportation, Oil and Gas Companies November 19th, 2014

Graphene/nanotube hybrid benefits flexible solar cells: Rice University labs create novel electrode for dye-sensitized cells November 17th, 2014

SouthWest NanoTechnologies to Demonstrate 3D Capacitive Touch Sensor Featuring Transparent, Thermoformed Carbon Nanotube Ink at Printed Electronics USA 2014 (Booth J25) -- “Conductive and Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Inks” will be Topic of Company Presentation November 10th, 2014

Neural Canals Produced in Iran for Recovery of Sciatica Nerve November 8th, 2014

Announcements

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

JPK reports on the use of AFM and the CellHesion module to study plant cells at the University of Queensland November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos November 25th, 2014

Tools

Renishaw receives Queen's Award for spectroscopy developments November 25th, 2014

JPK reports on the use of AFM and the CellHesion module to study plant cells at the University of Queensland November 25th, 2014

A*STAR SIMTech wins international award for breaking new ground in actuators: SIMTech invention can be used in an array of industries, and is critical for next generation ultra-precision systems November 24th, 2014

Professional AFM Images with a Three Step Click SmartScan by Park Systems Revolutionizes Atomic Force Microscopy by Automatizing the Imaging Process November 24th, 2014

Research partnerships

Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals November 25th, 2014

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria: In mice, therapeutic nanoparticles dampen H. pylori bacteria and inflammation that lead to ulcers and gastric cancer November 25th, 2014

Characterization of X-ray flashes open new perspectives in X-ray science: Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world November 24th, 2014

Research reveals how our bodies keep unwelcome visitors out of cell nuclei November 24th, 2014

Quantum nanoscience

Cooling with the coldest matter in the world November 24th, 2014

Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites November 20th, 2014

Pseudospin-driven spin relaxation mechanism in graphene November 11th, 2014

Heat Transfer Sets the Noise Floor for Ultrasensitive Electronics November 11th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More












ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE