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Home > News > Non-Abelian anyons: New particles for less than a billion?

November 1st, 2010

Non-Abelian anyons: New particles for less than a billion?

Abstract:
Half a century ago, Richard Feynman famously proclaimed, "There's plenty of room at the bottom," while attempting to foresee the developments in what nowadays has become nanoscience and nanotechnology. He also said, "This field…will not tell us much of fundamental physics (in the sense of, ‘What are the strange particles?') but…it might tell us much of great interest about the strange phenomena that occur in complex situations." Well, as it turns out, such strange phenomena may, in fact, involve very unusual new particles.

Source:
aps.org

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