Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Humble protein, nanoparticles tag-team to kill cancer cells

Images of Ramos cells targeted with nanoparticles. Particles carrying human transferrin (white dots, above image and close-up insert) were able to zero in on, attach to and enter cells (grey spheres).
Images of Ramos cells targeted with nanoparticles. Particles carrying human transferrin (white dots, above image and close-up insert) were able to zero in on, attach to and enter cells (grey spheres).

Abstract:
A normally benign protein found in the human body appears to be able - when paired with nanoparticles - to zero in on and kill certain cancer cells, without having to also load those particles with chemotherapy drugs.

Humble protein, nanoparticles tag-team to kill cancer cells

Chapel Hill, NC | Posted on August 3rd, 2010

The finding could lead to a new strategy for targeted cancer therapies, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists who made the discovery.

However, they also cautioned that the result raises concerns about unanticipated "off-target" effects when designing nano-delivery agents.

Transferrin, the fourth most abundant protein in human blood, has been used as a tumor-targeting agent for delivering cancer drugs for almost two decades. The protein's receptor is over-expressed on the surface of many rapidly growing cancers cells, so treatments combined with transferrin ligands are able to seek out and bind to them. Nanoparticles infused with transferrin have long been regarded as safe and nontoxic.

Now, UNC researchers have shown that, surprisingly, attaching transferrin to a nanoparticle surface can effectively and selectively target and kill B-cell lymphoma cells, found in an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It had been thought that nanoparticles would also need to carry toxic chemotherapy agents to have such an effect.

The discovery was made by a team of researchers led by Joseph DeSimone, Ph.D., Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry in UNC's College of Arts and Sciences and William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University, along with Jin Wang, Ph.D., and Shaomin Tian, Ph.D., in DeSimone's lab. Their findings appear in this week's online issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The scientists say the result is an interesting development in the field of nanomedicine, which researchers hope will eventually provide widely accepted alternatives - or replacements - to chemo and radiation treatment. Those therapies, while considered the most effective methods currently available for tackling cancer, also often damage healthy tissues and organs as a side effect.

Using PRINT (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology — a technique invented in DeSimone's lab that allows scientists to produce nanoparticles with well-defined size and shape — the UNC researchers produced biocompatible nanoparticles bonded with human transferrin, and demonstrated that the particles can safely and accurately recognize a broad spectrum of cancers. As well as B-cell lymphoma cells, the particles also effectively targeted non-small cell lung, ovarian, liver and prostate cancer cells.

Generally, the nanoparticles were non-toxic to such cells and should therefore be able to be loaded with standard chemotherapy agents and used to hone in on those cancers.

However, for Ramos cells, an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma, the transferrin-bonded PRINT nanoparticles not only recognized them but also induced cell death. Meanwhile, free transferrin - which was incubated with Ramos cells but not bound to any nanoparticles - did not kill any Ramos cells, even at high concentrations.

Researchers are carrying out further studies to determine how and why the transferrin-carrying nanoparticles proved toxic to the Ramos cells but not the other tumor types.

"Although this is potentially exciting for the development of entirely new strategies for treating certain types of lymphomas with potentially lower side effects, this study also raises concerns for unanticipated off-target effects when one is designing targeted chemotherapy agents for other types of cancers," said DeSimone. DeSimone is also a member of UNC's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the co-principal investigator for the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. He was also recently appointed as an adjunct member at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Other UNC coauthors were Robby A. Petros, Ph.D., and Mary E. Napier, Ph.D., from the chemistry department and the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence.

The study, "The Complex Role of Multivalency in Nanoparticles Targeting the Transferrin Receptor for Cancer Therapies," was funded by the National Science Foundation; the National Institutes for Health; the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence; the William R. Kenan Professorship; Liquidia Technologies; and the North Carolina University Cancer Research Fund, established by the N.C General Assembly to help prevent and treat cancer across the state.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
News Services contact:
Patric Lane
(919) 962-8596

Copyright © University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces Next Large Order from the Oil and Gas Industry March 26th, 2015

Quantum compute this -- WSU mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks: Revamped knapsack code offers online security for the future March 26th, 2015

Thousands of atoms entangled with a single photon: Result could make atomic clocks more accurate March 26th, 2015

Square ice filling for a graphene sandwich March 26th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

LAMDAMAP 2015 hosted by the University March 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly & M+W Make Major Announcement: Major Expansion To Include M+W Owned Gehrlicher Solar America Corporation That Will Create up to 400 Jobs to Develop Solar Power Plants at SUNY Poly Sites Across New York State March 26th, 2015

Thousands of atoms entangled with a single photon: Result could make atomic clocks more accurate March 26th, 2015

Carbon nanotube fibers make superior links to brain: Rice University invention provides two-way communication with neurons March 25th, 2015

Possible Futures

Nanotechnology in Medical Devices Market is expected to reach $8.5 Billion by 2019 March 25th, 2015

Nanotechnology Enabled Drug Delivery to Influence Future Diagnosis and Treatments of Diseases March 21st, 2015

Nanocomposites Market Growth, Industry Outlook To 2020 by Grand View Research, Inc. March 21st, 2015

Nanotechnology Drug Delivery Market in the US 2012-2016 : Latest Report Available by Radiant Insights, Inc March 16th, 2015

Academic/Education

LAMDAMAP 2015 hosted by the University March 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly & M+W Make Major Announcement: Major Expansion To Include M+W Owned Gehrlicher Solar America Corporation That Will Create up to 400 Jobs to Develop Solar Power Plants at SUNY Poly Sites Across New York State March 26th, 2015

SUNY POLY CNSE to Host First Ever Northeast Semi Supply Conference (NESCO) Conference Will Connect New and Emerging Innovators in the Northeastern US and Canada with Industry Leaders and Strategic Investors to Discuss Future Growth Opportunities in NYS March 25th, 2015

FEI Joins University of Ulm and CEOS on SALVE Project Research Collaboration: The Sub-Ångström Low Voltage Electron (SALVE) microscope should improve contrast and reduce damage on bio-molecules and two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene March 18th, 2015

Nanomedicine

Graphene reduces wear of alumina ceramic March 26th, 2015

Application of Graphene Oxide in Body Implants in Iran March 26th, 2015

Nanorobotic agents open the blood-brain barrier, offering hope for new brain treatments March 25th, 2015

Nanotechnology in Medical Devices Market is expected to reach $8.5 Billion by 2019 March 25th, 2015

Announcements

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces Next Large Order from the Oil and Gas Industry March 26th, 2015

Quantum compute this -- WSU mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks: Revamped knapsack code offers online security for the future March 26th, 2015

Thousands of atoms entangled with a single photon: Result could make atomic clocks more accurate March 26th, 2015

Square ice filling for a graphene sandwich March 26th, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Dolomite’s microfluidics technology ideal for B cell encapsulation March 24th, 2015

Tiny bio-robot is a germ suited-up with graphene quantum dots March 24th, 2015

TGAC's take on the first portable DNA sequencing 'laboratory': First remote laboratory allows researchers to conduct real-time anaylsis March 19th, 2015

Super-resolution microscopes reveal the link between genome packaging and cell pluripotency: A study using super-resolution microscopy reveals that our genome is not regularly packaged and links these packaging differences to stem cell state March 12th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE