Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > First graphene touchscreen

The researchers built up a graphene layer on copper foil and then used rollers to transfer the graphene to a polymer support and then onto a final substrate. © Nature Nanotechnology
The researchers built up a graphene layer on copper foil and then used rollers to transfer the graphene to a polymer support and then onto a final substrate. © Nature Nanotechnology

Abstract:
Researchers in Korea and Japan have fabricated films of graphene - planar sheets of carbon one atom thick - measuring tens of centimetres. The researchers engineered these large graphene films into transparent electrodes, which were incorporated into touchscreen panel devices.

By Simon Hadlington

First graphene touchscreen

UK | Posted on June 22nd, 2010

The new work represents another milestone in the astonishing technological advance of graphene from its initial isolation only a few years ago. Experts predict that graphene will be found in consumer products within a couple of years.

The team, led by Jong-Hyun Ahn and Byung Hee Hong of Sungkyunkwan University, Korea, grew a graphene layer on copper foil by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using a previously demonstrated technique.

Using a roller, the graphene face can then be pressed against an adhesive polymer support and the copper etched away, leaving the graphene film attached to the polymer. The graphene can then be pressed against a final substrate - such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) - again using rollers, and the polymer adhesive released by heating. Subsequent layers of graphene can then be added in a similar way.

The researchers used this technique to create a rectangular graphene film measuring 30 inches (76 cm) in the diagonal. The graphene was doped by treating with nitric acid and in this form the graphene sheet can act as a large, transparent electrode and was demonstrated to work in a touchscreen device.

Typically, transparent electrodes used in such applications are made from indium tin oxides (ITO). The researchers say that the graphene electrode has better transparency and is tougher. 'The price of indium has increased by a few times over the past decades and this will be more serious as markets for display and solar cells expand,' says Ahn.'In addition, oxide materials like ITO are usually fragile and weak.' Because of this, ITO-based touchscreens have a finite life span, whereas, says Ahn, a graphene-based screen should last essentially forever.

'In addition, the graphene production needs just a tiny amount of carbon sources without any rare materials, and the copper substrate is recyclable, so it is much more environmentally friendly than ITO production.'

Andre Geim of the University of Manchester in the UK, who is widely credited as being the founding father of modern graphene science having discovered isolated graphene around five years ago, says the new work demonstrates the astonishing rapidity with which graphene technology has advanced. 'This clearly shows that graphene is no longer wishful thinking as far as industrial applications go. People have gone from lab-scale to industrial-scale production unbelievably quickly. Within two years we will have consumer products.'

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Royal Society of Chemistry

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Increase Power, Energy of Supercapacitors December 18th, 2014

Display technology/LEDs/SS Lighting/OLEDs

Unraveling the light of fireflies December 17th, 2014

TCL Launches World’s Most Advanced TV in the World’s Largest Market: New Quantum Dot TVs with Color IQ™ Optics Deliver OLED-Quality Color at a Fraction of the Price December 15th, 2014

Dartmouth researchers create 'green' process to reduce molecular switching waste December 15th, 2014

Stacking two-dimensional materials may lower cost of semiconductor devices December 11th, 2014

Videos/Movies

“Line dancing bacteria win the 2014 Dolomite and Lab on a Chip Video Competition” December 16th, 2014

Possible Futures

A novel method for identifying the body’s ‘noisiest’ networks November 19th, 2014

Researchers discern the shapes of high-order Brownian motions November 17th, 2014

VDMA Electronics Production Equipment: Growth track for 2014 and 2015 confirmed: Business climate survey shows robust industry sector November 14th, 2014

Open Materials Development Will Be Key for HP's Success in 3D Printing: HP can make a big splash in 3D printing, but it needs to shore up technology claims and avoid the temptation of the razor/razor blade business model in order to flourish November 11th, 2014

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly NanoCollege Faculty Member Selected as American Physical Society Fellow: SUNY Poly Associate Professor of Nanoscience Dr. Vincent LaBella Recognized for Significant Technological Innovations that Enable Interactive Learning December 17th, 2014

Nanomedicine expert joins Rice faculty: Gang Bao combines genetic, nano and imaging techniques to fight disease December 17th, 2014

FEI and Oregon Health & Science University Install a Complete Correlative Microscopy Workflow in Newly Built Collaborative Science Facility December 16th, 2014

Student Nanotechnology Laboratories Network Set Up in Iran December 15th, 2014

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

A sponge-like molecular cage for purification of fullerenes December 15th, 2014

'Trojan horse' proteins used to target hard-to-reach cancers: Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings December 11th, 2014

Detecting gases wirelessly and cheaply: New sensor can transmit information on hazardous chemicals or food spoilage to a smartphone December 8th, 2014

Green meets nano: Scientists at TU Darmstadt create multifunctional nanotubes using nontoxic materials December 3rd, 2014

Announcements

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Increase Power, Energy of Supercapacitors December 18th, 2014

Research partnerships

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Unraveling the light of fireflies December 17th, 2014

Scientists trace nanoparticles from plants to caterpillars: Rice University study examines how nanoparticles behave in food chain December 16th, 2014

FEI and Oregon Health & Science University Install a Complete Correlative Microscopy Workflow in Newly Built Collaborative Science Facility December 16th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE