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Home > Press > Enter The Nano Age - New Website Explains Why the Science & Technology of the Very Small is Poised to Become Extremely Big

Abstract:
A newly launched website, TheNanoAge.com attempts to explain the basics of the entire field of nanotechnology to a general audience while alluding to its potential to be used for either good or evil. The next big thing is going to be very, very small.

Enter The Nano Age - New Website Explains Why the Science & Technology of the Very Small is Poised to Become Extremely Big

Posted on June 4th, 2010

Officially launched on the 29th of December, 2009, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the visionary lecture that began an entire field of research and development, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom," TheNanoAge attempts to explain the basics of nanotechnology to a general audience while alluding to its potential to be used for either good or evil.

The next big thing is going to be very, very small. Nanotechnology is defined as,

"The design, characterization, production, and application of structures, devices, and systems by controlled manipulation of size and shape at the nanometer scale (atomic, molecular, and macromolecular scale) that produces structures, devices, and systems with at least one novel/superior characteristic or property."

The Nanotech Age is expected to begin between 2025 and 2050 bringing an end to the current Information Age which began in 1990. Humankind is poised at the precipice of the single greatest innovation in the history of science and technology. Coming is a Nano Revolution that will be at least as transformative as the Industrial Revolution (perhaps much more so), but packed into just a few years.

TheNanoAge website takes the trajectory of technology trends and their interrelationships into account, constructing a vivid description of our most probable near/long-term future. For instance, futurist and inventor, Ray Kurzweil points out that we can expect computer processors to be 1000 times faster than they are today in just ten years, one million times faster in 20 years, and a billion times faster in 30 years. These are remarkably regular trends that can be predicted
with great accuracy. As computers become thousands of times faster and smaller thanks to nanotech, new technologies will be developed that integrate computing seamlessly into the world.

Equally exciting is the budding field of nanomedicine which promises to take the practice of medicine to an entirely new level, enabling upgrades and replacement parts for the human body and eradicating all diseases, illnesses and even aging itself. Nanomedicine has the potential to work from within the patient with molecular precision, making current medical practice look like it is in the Dark Ages.

Site founder, Steve Young emphasized, "There is a need for greater public understanding about the nano field, its potentials, and implications, so that people are better able to make informed decisions on the issues, as they arise."

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For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Steve Young
Phone: (705) 719-1844

Copyright © TheNanoAge

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