Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Less is more! Nanopatch is 100 times better than needle and syringe

Professor Kendall
Professor Kendall

Abstract:
New research, led by Professor Mark Kendall, from UQ's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, demonstrates that a vaccine delivered by a Nanopatch induces a similarly protective immune response as a vaccine delivered by needle and syringe, but uses 100 times less vaccine.

Less is more! Nanopatch is 100 times better than needle and syringe

Brisbane, Australia | Posted on April 22nd, 2010

This discovery has implications for many vaccination programs in both industrialised and developing nations, which must overcome issues with vaccine shortages and distribution.

Being both painless and needle-free, the nanopatch offers hope for those with needle phobia, as well as improving the vaccination experience for young children.

"The Nanopatch targeted specific antigen-presenting cells found in a narrow layer just beneath the skin surface and as a result we used less than one hundredth of the dose used by a needle while stimulating a comparable immune response," Professor Kendall said.

"Our result is ten times better than the best results achieved by other delivery methods and does not require the use of other immune stimulants, called adjuvants, or multiple vaccinations.

"Because the Nanopatch requires neither a trained practitioner to administer it nor refrigeration, it has enormous potential cheaply deliver vaccines in developing nations," he said.

Professor Kendall said the Nanopatch� was much smaller than a postage stamp and comprised of several thousands of densely packed projections invisible to the human eye.

The influenza vaccine was dry coated onto these projections and applied to the skin of mice for two minutes. "By using far less vaccine we believe that the Nanopatch will enable the vaccination of many more people," Professor Kendall said.

"When compared to a needle and syringe a nanopatch is cheap to produce and it is easy to imagine a situation in which a government might provide vaccinations for a pandemic such as swine flu to be collected from a chemist or sent in the mail.

"This is an exciting discovery and our next step is to prove the effectiveness of Nanopatches in human clinical trials," he said.

Professor Kendall's team includes researchers from UQ's Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine and Faculty of Health Sciences, as well as the University of Melbourne.

The work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the National Health and Medical Research Council, and the Queensland Government's Smart State Scheme.

AIBN is a multidisciplinary research institute focused on addressing some of the intricate problems in the areas of health, energy and the environment.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Media:
Professor Mark Kendall
07 3346 4203 or 0431 162 391

Copyright © University of Queensland

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Two-stage nanoparticle delivery of piperlongumine and TRAIL anti-cancer therapy May 23rd, 2016

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties: Dual-function, graphene-based material good for aircraft, extreme environments May 23rd, 2016

Graphene makes rubber more rubbery May 23rd, 2016

Possible Futures

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Tiny packages may pack powerful treatment for brain tumors: Nanocarrier provides efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic drug May 23rd, 2016

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties: Dual-function, graphene-based material good for aircraft, extreme environments May 23rd, 2016

Graphene makes rubber more rubbery May 23rd, 2016

Academic/Education

Graphene: Progress, not quantum leaps May 23rd, 2016

Smithsonian Science Education Center and National Space Society Team Up for Next-Generation Space Education Program "Enterprise In Space" May 11th, 2016

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation May 9th, 2016

Albertan Science Lab Opens in India May 7th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition May 23rd, 2016

Tiny packages may pack powerful treatment for brain tumors: Nanocarrier provides efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic drug May 23rd, 2016

Two-stage nanoparticle delivery of piperlongumine and TRAIL anti-cancer therapy May 23rd, 2016

Announcements

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Two-stage nanoparticle delivery of piperlongumine and TRAIL anti-cancer therapy May 23rd, 2016

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties: Dual-function, graphene-based material good for aircraft, extreme environments May 23rd, 2016

Graphene makes rubber more rubbery May 23rd, 2016

Nanobiotechnology

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition May 23rd, 2016

Tiny packages may pack powerful treatment for brain tumors: Nanocarrier provides efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic drug May 23rd, 2016

Two-stage nanoparticle delivery of piperlongumine and TRAIL anti-cancer therapy May 23rd, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic