Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: Making Cells Feel Right at Home

Abstract:
A team of Houston scientists has unveiled a new technique that uses magnetic nanobeads to levitate cells, allowing them to grow into three-dimensional structures.

Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: Making Cells Feel Right at Home

Bethesda, MD | Posted on April 20th, 2010

This technological leap from the flat Petri dish has the potential for significant impact on cancer research, where recent studies have demonstrated that cancer cells growing in two-dimensional sheets are not the optimal systems for studying potential anticancer agents. In fact, techniques for growing cells in three-dimensional structures could save millions of dollars in drug-testing costs.

Renata Pasqualini and Wadih Arap, of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and Thomas Killian, of Rice University, led this study, which was reported in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Dr. Pasqualini is also a member of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, one of 12 Centers funded by the National Cancer Institute to foster the development of innovative ideas and new fields of study based on knowledge of the biological and physical laws and principles that define both normal and tumor systems.

The three-dimensional technique is easy enough for most labs to set up immediately. It uses magnetic nanoparticles to levitate cells while they divide and grow. Compared with cell cultures grown on flat surfaces, the three-dimensional cell cultures tend to form tissues that more closely resemble those inside the body. "There's a big push right now to find ways to grow cells in three-dimensional because the body is three-dimensional, and cultures that more closely resemble native tissue are expected to provide better results for preclinical drug tests," said Dr. Killian. "If you could improve the accuracy of early drug screenings by just 10 percent, it's estimated you could save as much as $100 million per drug." For cancer research, the "invisible scaffold" created by the magnetic field goes beyond its potential for producing cell cultures that are more reminiscent of real tumors, which itself would be an important advance, added Dr. Arap.

To make cells levitate, the research team modified a combination of gold nanoparticles and engineered viral particles called "phage" that was developed in the lab of Drs. Arap and Pasqualini. This targeted "nanoshuttle" can deliver payloads to specific organs or tissues.

"A logical next step for us will be to use this additional magnetic property in targeted ways to explore possible applications in the imaging and treatment of tumors," Dr. Arap said.

In the current study, the researchers added magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to a gel that contains phage. When cells are added to the gel, the phage causes the particles to be absorbed into cells over a few hours. The gel is then washed away, and the nanoparticle-loaded cells are placed in a Petri dish filled with a liquid that promotes cell growth and division. By placing a coin-sized magnet atop the dish's lid, the researchers found that they could lift the cells off the bottom of the dish, concentrate them, and allow them to grow and divide while they were suspended in the liquid. In a key experiment using glioblastoma cells, the investigators found that cells grown in the three-dimensional medium produced proteins that were similar to those produced by gliobastoma tumors in mice, while cells grown in two dimensions did not show this similarity.

This work, which was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute, is detailed in a paper titled, "Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation." Investigators from Nano3D Biosciences, which has licensed this technology for commercial development, also participated in this study. An abstract of this paper is available at the journal's Web site.

####

About NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer
To help meet the goal of reducing the burden of cancer, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is engaged in efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat and prevent cancer.

The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is a comprehensive, systematized initiative encompassing the public and private sectors, designed to accelerate the application of the best capabilities of nanotechnology to cancer.

Currently, scientists are limited in their ability to turn promising molecular discoveries into benefits for cancer patients. Nanotechnology can provide the technical power and tools that will enable those developing new diagnostics, therapeutics, and preventives to keep pace with today’s explosion in knowledge.

For more information, please click here

Copyright © NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanotech could rid cattle of ticks, with less collateral damage September 1st, 2015

Scientists 'squeeze' light one particle at a time: A team of scientists have measured a bizarre effect in quantum physics, in which individual particles of light are said to have been 'squeezed' -- an achievement which at least one textbook had written off as hopeless September 1st, 2015

Using ultrathin sheets to discover new class of wrapped shapes: UMass Amherst materials researchers describe a new regime of wrapped shapes August 31st, 2015

New material science research may advance tech tools August 31st, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets August 31st, 2015

New material science research may advance tech tools August 31st, 2015

Artificial leaf harnesses sunlight for efficient fuel production August 30th, 2015

Researchers use DNA 'clews' to shuttle CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells August 30th, 2015

Possible Futures

Sediment dwelling creatures at risk from nanoparticles in common household products August 13th, 2015

Harris & Harris Group Reports Financial Statements as of June 30, 2015, and Announces a Stock Repurchase Program August 10th, 2015

Molecular trick alters rules of attraction for non-magnetic metals August 5th, 2015

Global Carbon Nanotubes Industry 2015: Acute Market Reports August 4th, 2015

Academic/Education

Announcing Oxford Instruments and School of Physics signing a Memorandum of Understanding August 26th, 2015

Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan, uses Raman microscopy to study crystallographic defects in silicon carbide wafers August 25th, 2015

JPK reports on the use of a NanoWizard® AFM-SECM system at the Université Paris Diderot looking at nanoscale biostructures August 18th, 2015

Rice, Penn State open center for 2-D coatings: National Science Foundation selects universities to develop atom-thin materials with industry partners August 13th, 2015

Nanomedicine

Efficiency of Nanodrug Containing Antibiotics in Treatment of Infectious Diseases Evaluated August 31st, 2015

Researchers use DNA 'clews' to shuttle CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells August 30th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Artemisia Annua Plant to Produce Breast Cancer Drugs August 29th, 2015

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

Announcements

Nanotech could rid cattle of ticks, with less collateral damage September 1st, 2015

Scientists 'squeeze' light one particle at a time: A team of scientists have measured a bizarre effect in quantum physics, in which individual particles of light are said to have been 'squeezed' -- an achievement which at least one textbook had written off as hopeless September 1st, 2015

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets August 31st, 2015

New material science research may advance tech tools August 31st, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Researchers use DNA 'clews' to shuttle CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells August 30th, 2015

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

Nanotechnology that will impact the Security & Defense sectors to be discussed at NanoSD2015 conference August 25th, 2015

Louisiana Tech University researchers discover synthesis of a new nanomaterial: Interdisciplinary team creates biocomposite for first time using physiological conditions August 24th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic