Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > UW-Madison faculty honored by American Chemical Society

Abstract:
On March 23, five University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty members and one former student were recognized by the American Chemical Society at its annual meeting in San Francisco.

By David Tenenbaum

UW-Madison faculty honored by American Chemical Society

Madison, WI | Posted on March 31st, 2010

Honored were:

* Lawrence F. Dahl, professor emeritus of chemistry: Dahl has won the F. Albert Cotton Award in Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry for building large molecules containing metals, such as nickel, platinum and gold. He says these record-setting nanosized metal clusters, generally containing 50-165 close-packed metal atoms, could become the basis for nanotechnology materials with useful catalytic, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Dahl mentored 95 Ph.D. students during his tenure at UW-Madison and continues to perform research during retirement.

* Clark Landis, professor of chemistry: Landis won the Award in Organometallic Chemistry for influential contributions to a branch of chemistry that combines metals and organic compounds, with a focus on the use of catalysts to build the long-chain molecules called polymers. His studies helped explain the behavior of the catalysts that plastics manufacturers use to make billions of pounds of polyethylene and polypropylene. Landis has helped discover how catalysts control whether a developing molecule will take the "left-hand" or a "right-hand" shape. Identical molecules with these mirror-image shapes can have distinct biological properties.
Sang-Hee Shim (Ph.D. chemistry) and Martin Zanni, associate professor of chemistry: Shim and Zanni won the Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry for studies that have revolutionized the technology of infrared spectroscopy, which uses light to obtain information about the structure and composition of molecules. During her Ph.D. work with Zanni, Shim learned to control light with extreme precision, and then used it to study changes in amyloid fibers, which are strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Zanni became the first person to receive this award as both student and mentor; Shim is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

* Helen Blackwell, associate professor of chemistry: Blackwell won the society's Cope Scholar Award for studies of chemical communication among bacteria. Using "quorum sensing," bacteria can change behavior when their population passes a threshold. Quorum sensing can explain how bacteria can quietly persist at low concentrations, and then suddenly become pathogenic. Blackwell has designed and built synthetic molecules to prevent bacteria from orchestrating group activities such as infection or forming drug-resistant biofilms, and is also examining how bacteria use quorum sensing to interact with higher organisms. "We'd like to understand how quorum sensing impacts host colonization and see if we can use non-native molecules to perturb any potential cross talk between the bugs and us," she says. Blackwell will formally receive the award at the next society annual meeting in Boston.

* Ron Seely, senior lecturer, life sciences communication: Seely won the Grady-Stack award for his coverage of science and environment at the Wisconsin State Journal during more than 20 years. His reporting has ranged from scientific discoveries at UW-Madison to city drinking water and, most recently, the environmental challenges posed by manure disposal at large concentrations of farm animals.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Wisconsin-Madison

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Effective Nanotechnology Innovations to Receive Mustafa Prize September 16th, 2014

‘Small’ transformation yields big changes September 16th, 2014

Elusive Quantum Transformations Found Near Absolute Zero: Brookhaven Lab and Stony Brook University researchers measured the quantum fluctuations behind a novel magnetic material's ultra-cold ferromagnetic phase transition September 15th, 2014

'Squid skin' metamaterials project yields vivid color display: Rice lab creates RGB color display technology with aluminum nanorods September 15th, 2014

Academic/Education

Malvern technology delivers Malvern reliability in multi-disciplinary lab at Queen Mary University London September 9th, 2014

State University of New York Trustees Unanimously Approve SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) as New Name for Merged SUNY CNSE / SUNYIT September 9th, 2014

New Vice President Takes Helm at CNSE CMOST: Catherine Gilbert To Lead CNSE Children’s Museum of Science and Technology Through Expansion And Relocation August 29th, 2014

RMIT delivers $30m boost to micro and nano-tech August 26th, 2014

Announcements

Effective Nanotechnology Innovations to Receive Mustafa Prize September 16th, 2014

‘Small’ transformation yields big changes September 16th, 2014

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Simple, Cost-Effective Method Proposed for Synthesizing Zinc Oxide Nanopigments September 15th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE