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Home > News > Nano-scale Ultra Capacitors Challenge Lithium-Ion Battery

March 31st, 2010

Nano-scale Ultra Capacitors Challenge Lithium-Ion Battery

Abstract:
Does your laptop battery die out right before you hit send on that important email? With scientists at MIT, Intel and other facilities researching microstructures (i.e. micro- or nano-scale pieces of computing hardware) it may be only a matter of time before nano-scale ultra-powerful capacitors challenge lithium-ion batteries.

Intel researchers have been working on "ultracapacitors with a greater energy density than today's lithium batteries," according to EE Times. Intel is looking into producing these nano-scale ultracapacitors in high-volume manufacturing, meaning that if successful, they may be potentially capable of powering gadgets like smartphones and laptops.

Source:
sfgate.com

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