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Home > News > TRADOC predicts the future of warfare

January 11th, 2010

TRADOC predicts the future of warfare

Abstract:
Training and Doctrine Command released its vision of future warfare in December, and at times it reads like a script by Gene Roddenberry, creator of "Star Trek."

TRADOC predicts in the report the Army will be at war until 2028, and its Future Force Capstone Concept projects what the force should look like to effectively wage a future war.

Future forces should have vehicles better protected from improvised explosive devices. The report calls for troop carriers that are well armored with the ability to protect light infantry without sacrificing mobility. One suggestion is to explore nanotechnology, which can change the structure of matter on a molecular and atomic level, so the Army could engineer armor that is harder and more resistant to IED explosions.

Source:
armytimes.com

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