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Home > News > The Spooky World of Quantum Entanglement

December 30th, 2009

The Spooky World of Quantum Entanglement

Why can't we be in two places simultaneously? Why can't we communicate instantaneously? Better yet, why can't we teleport ourselves to another location instantly?

Actually subatomic particles can. Unfortunately, even though we are comprised of these very particles, big objects don't follow the rules of quantum mechanics, which, at the subatomic level, makes possible such incredible feats. But the weird nature of quantum behavior explicit in the subatomic world is gradually encroaching our classical world. Researchers are in pursuit of applications that would assist us in overcoming space-time constraints and the laws of classical physics. Future generations might see teleportation and a universal quantum web as a normal aspect of their daily life.


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