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Home > Press > New technique detects proteins that cause aging

The new method (right) distinguishes between the sugar-modified and unmodified proteins much better than the traditional gel electrophoresis method (left)
The new method (right) distinguishes between the sugar-modified and unmodified proteins much better than the traditional gel electrophoresis method (left)

Abstract:
Chemists and biologists from the University of Bath have developed a new technique that could be used to diagnose and develop treatments for age-related conditions like Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and cancer.

New technique detects proteins that cause aging

Bath | Posted on December 15th, 2009

In these diseases, proteins in the body react with sugars in a process called glycation. This modifies the protein's function and can trigger complications such as inflammation and premature aging.

The team at Bath, led by Dr Jean van den Elsen and Dr Tony James, has developed a technique that can detect glycated proteins and could in the future be used for diagnosing a whole range of diseases in patients.

They used a technique called gel electrophoresis, where samples are put into a thin gel layer and an electric current is applied. The gel acts like a molecular sieve, sorting proteins from the samples according to their size and shape, allowing scientists to identify whether specific proteins are present in the blood.

For this study, the researchers have patented a new type of gel electrophoresis, which uses boronic acid to distinguish between the glycated and unmodified proteins.

Dr Tony James from the University's Department of Chemistry explained: "Not all sugars are ‘bad' - in fact many proteins contain beneficial ‘good' sugar units.

"However, some sugars can be ‘bad' and cause complications in diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes.

Dr Jean van den Elsen, from the University's Department of Biology & Biochemistry, said: "Our method specifically recognises these ‘bad' sugars in the presence of the ‘good' sugars and as such is an excellent diagnostic tool."

PhD student Marta Pereira Morais added: "We believe our method will also aid the development of new drug based therapies for these diseases."

Whilst the technique has only been assessed in the lab at present, the researchers say it has the potential to be developed into a test for these conditions in patients.

Dr James added: "Currently there is no blood test for Alzheimer's disease.

"If we can develop this technique into a test, doctors could potentially diagnose patients at an early stage before their symptoms show up in a brain scan."

The method could also be used to diagnose diabetes, which also leads to elevated levels of glycated proteins in the blood.

Dr van den Elsen said: "Whilst there are other methods of detecting diabetes, this will be an excellent way to measure the level of this glycation damage."

The importance of the technique has been recognised by publication in the scientific journal Proteomics and by the University which has patented the method.

The project was funded from a number of sources including the University's Enterprise Development Fund (EDF), the Biotechnology & Biological Sciences Research Council and the Royal Society.

The team is now looking for industrial collaborators to help develop the technique further with the aid of the University's technology transfer centre, Bath Ventures.

####

About University of Bath
The University of Bath is one of the UK’s leading universities, with an international reputation for quality research and teaching. Bath is ranked in the UK top ten of universities in both The Guardian University Guide and the Complete University Guide published by The Independent. The University values working collaboratively with others and has a global network of contacts in business, the professions, the public sector, and the voluntary sector. It also benefits from strong links with the local community.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
For media enquiries:
Vicky Just
University Press Office
44 (0) 1225 386883
44 (0) 7966 341357

Copyright © University of Bath

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